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Conference Paper: Effects of Qigong exercise and its dose-response relationship in reducing fatigue for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a randomized waitlist-controlled trial

TitleEffects of Qigong exercise and its dose-response relationship in reducing fatigue for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a randomized waitlist-controlled trial
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160
Citation
The 33rd Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2012), New Orleans, LA., 11-14 April 2012. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 43 suppl. 1, p. S282 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a medically unexplained illness with no definite effective treatment yet.Our previous pilot study showed that qigong exercise can reduce fatigue and improve quality of life for patients with CFS. Objectives: In this study, the effect of qigong exercise in reducing fatigue and its dose-response relationship were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and thirty seven participants completed an RCT (intervention: n=72, age, 42.4 (6.7), female: 72%; control: n=65, age, 42.5 (6.4), female: 82%). Intervention was ten 2-hour sessions of qigong exercise training (Wuxing Pingheng-gong) by an experienced Daoist qigong master (YLP). The primary outcome measure was Chalder et al’s fatigue score. In addition, to evaluate the dose-response relationship, participants in the intervention group were asked to record weekly the frequency and duration of their qigong practice. RESULTS: The intervention and control groups were comparable at baseline. After the intervention, changes in fatigue score were -14.7 (10.3) and -5.8 (7.3) for the intervention and control groups respectively (p<.001). Among the intervention group participants, those who practiced qigong at least three times per week (n=38) reported significantly bigger improvements than those who practiced fewer than three times per week (n=18) [-17.3 (8.9) vs -9.3 (11.4), p =.006]. Patients who spent at least 30 minutes in each qigong practice (n=28) also reported bigger improvements than those who did not (n=28) [-17.9 (8.4) vs -11.6 (11.3), p=.021]. CONCLUSION: Qigong exercise can help patients with CFS reduce the level of fatigue. A practice regimen of at least 3 days per week and at least 30 minutes each time may produce better results.
DescriptionTheme: Engaging New Partners & Perspectives
Paper Session 34: Complementary and Integrative Medicine Interventions (P34)
Meritorious Paper
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183242
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.195
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.112

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYuen, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, THYen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, JSTen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-15T01:50:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-15T01:50:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 33rd Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM 2012), New Orleans, LA., 11-14 April 2012. In Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2012, v. 43 suppl. 1, p. S282en_US
dc.identifier.issn0883-6612-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183242-
dc.descriptionTheme: Engaging New Partners & Perspectives-
dc.descriptionPaper Session 34: Complementary and Integrative Medicine Interventions (P34)-
dc.descriptionMeritorious Paper-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a medically unexplained illness with no definite effective treatment yet.Our previous pilot study showed that qigong exercise can reduce fatigue and improve quality of life for patients with CFS. Objectives: In this study, the effect of qigong exercise in reducing fatigue and its dose-response relationship were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and thirty seven participants completed an RCT (intervention: n=72, age, 42.4 (6.7), female: 72%; control: n=65, age, 42.5 (6.4), female: 82%). Intervention was ten 2-hour sessions of qigong exercise training (Wuxing Pingheng-gong) by an experienced Daoist qigong master (YLP). The primary outcome measure was Chalder et al’s fatigue score. In addition, to evaluate the dose-response relationship, participants in the intervention group were asked to record weekly the frequency and duration of their qigong practice. RESULTS: The intervention and control groups were comparable at baseline. After the intervention, changes in fatigue score were -14.7 (10.3) and -5.8 (7.3) for the intervention and control groups respectively (p<.001). Among the intervention group participants, those who practiced qigong at least three times per week (n=38) reported significantly bigger improvements than those who practiced fewer than three times per week (n=18) [-17.3 (8.9) vs -9.3 (11.4), p =.006]. Patients who spent at least 30 minutes in each qigong practice (n=28) also reported bigger improvements than those who did not (n=28) [-17.9 (8.4) vs -11.6 (11.3), p=.021]. CONCLUSION: Qigong exercise can help patients with CFS reduce the level of fatigue. A practice regimen of at least 3 days per week and at least 30 minutes each time may produce better results.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/medicine/journal/12160-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of Behavioral Medicineen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.titleEffects of Qigong exercise and its dose-response relationship in reducing fatigue for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a randomized waitlist-controlled trialen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, JSM: chansm5@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, THY: chanhangyee@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSham, JST: jstsham@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214080en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros211241-
dc.identifier.volume43-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS282-
dc.identifier.epageS282-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130605-

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