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postgraduate thesis: The role of interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 (IP10) in early-phase graft injury induced late-phase cisplatin resistance after livertransplantation

TitleThe role of interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 (IP10) in early-phase graft injury induced late-phase cisplatin resistance after livertransplantation
Authors
Advisors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Geng, W. [耿瑋]. (2012). The role of interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 (IP10) in early-phase graft injury induced late-phase cisplatin resistance after liver transplantation. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5016273
AbstractBackground: Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most fatal diseases worldwide. Liver transplantation dramatically improved the survival rate of HCC patients. However, tumor recurrence remains a huge threat to HCC patients without any promising curative treatment. Chemotherapy, as one of the potential treatments to recurrent HCC, did not show any significant effect either. Objective: We aim to investigate the role of interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 (IP10) in acute-phase liver graft injury induced late-phase cisplatin resistance after liver transplantation and to explore the underlying mechanism. Furthermore, a potential adjuvant therapy was expected to be identified to sensitize cisplatin treatment in HCC. Materials and methods: A rat orthotopic liver transplantation model was established with applying whole or small-for-size (50%) graft. Afterwards, a rat hepatoma cell (MH7777) was injected via portal vein to generate recurrent tumor. The expressions of genes linked to multi-drug resistance and graft injury were compared between tumors developed after liver transplantation using small and whole grafts. IP10 expression was further validated in clinical samples from two cohorts of patients including HCC patients with hepatectomy and HCC patients with liver transplantation. The extracellular and intracellular roles of IP10 were examined in vitro by using IP10 recombinant protein and IP10 stable transfectants in HCC cell lines. The correlation between IP10 expression and tumor growth was investigated in three in vivo nude mice models including a subcutaneous model, an orthotopic model and ischemia reperfusion injury model. The underlying mechanism was further explored in vitro, in vivo and in clinical samples. IP10 neutralizing antibody was employed as an adjuvant therapy to identify its effect on sensitizing cisplatin treatment in HCC. Results: The expressions of multidrug resistant genes were significantly up-regulated in liver and tumor from small-for-size group in rat liver transplantation model. IP10 was selected as the potential target for its constantly higher expression in liver and tumor tissues in small-for-size group. In clinical studies, IP10 was overexpressed in around 45% HCC patients with hepatectomy. The expression of circulating IP10 well correlated with tumor recurrence and small graft ratio in HCC patients after liver transplantation. In in vitro studies, it was demonstrated that overexpression of IP10 could significantly promote HCC cell proliferation either in short term or in long term cisplatin administration. In in vivo studies, subcutaneous and orthotopic nude mice models showed that the overexpression of IP10 have significant correlations with larger tumor volume and less tumor necrosis after cisplatin treatment. In mechanism studies, IP10 overexpression was found to be well correlated with the activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling pathways in vitro and further validated in vivo models and in clinical specimens. IP10 neutralizing antibody was identified as a potential therapy which could sensitize cisplatin treatment in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions: The high expression of IP10 was identified in two cohorts of clinical samples and showed significant correlations with tumor recurrence. Graft injury induced IP10 overexpression could significantly increase cisplatin resistance after liver transplantation via ER stress signaling pathways. IP10 neutralizing antibody may be applied as an alternative treatment for recurrent HCC after liver transplantation.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectChemokines.
Cisplatin.
Drug resistance.
Liver - Transplantation.
Liver - Wounds and injuries.
Dept/ProgramSurgery
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183059

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorMan, K-
dc.contributor.advisorLo, CM-
dc.contributor.advisorXu, A-
dc.contributor.authorGeng, Wei-
dc.contributor.author耿瑋-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-12T08:01:11Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-12T08:01:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationGeng, W. [耿瑋]. (2012). The role of interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 (IP10) in early-phase graft injury induced late-phase cisplatin resistance after liver transplantation. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b5016273-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/183059-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the most fatal diseases worldwide. Liver transplantation dramatically improved the survival rate of HCC patients. However, tumor recurrence remains a huge threat to HCC patients without any promising curative treatment. Chemotherapy, as one of the potential treatments to recurrent HCC, did not show any significant effect either. Objective: We aim to investigate the role of interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 (IP10) in acute-phase liver graft injury induced late-phase cisplatin resistance after liver transplantation and to explore the underlying mechanism. Furthermore, a potential adjuvant therapy was expected to be identified to sensitize cisplatin treatment in HCC. Materials and methods: A rat orthotopic liver transplantation model was established with applying whole or small-for-size (50%) graft. Afterwards, a rat hepatoma cell (MH7777) was injected via portal vein to generate recurrent tumor. The expressions of genes linked to multi-drug resistance and graft injury were compared between tumors developed after liver transplantation using small and whole grafts. IP10 expression was further validated in clinical samples from two cohorts of patients including HCC patients with hepatectomy and HCC patients with liver transplantation. The extracellular and intracellular roles of IP10 were examined in vitro by using IP10 recombinant protein and IP10 stable transfectants in HCC cell lines. The correlation between IP10 expression and tumor growth was investigated in three in vivo nude mice models including a subcutaneous model, an orthotopic model and ischemia reperfusion injury model. The underlying mechanism was further explored in vitro, in vivo and in clinical samples. IP10 neutralizing antibody was employed as an adjuvant therapy to identify its effect on sensitizing cisplatin treatment in HCC. Results: The expressions of multidrug resistant genes were significantly up-regulated in liver and tumor from small-for-size group in rat liver transplantation model. IP10 was selected as the potential target for its constantly higher expression in liver and tumor tissues in small-for-size group. In clinical studies, IP10 was overexpressed in around 45% HCC patients with hepatectomy. The expression of circulating IP10 well correlated with tumor recurrence and small graft ratio in HCC patients after liver transplantation. In in vitro studies, it was demonstrated that overexpression of IP10 could significantly promote HCC cell proliferation either in short term or in long term cisplatin administration. In in vivo studies, subcutaneous and orthotopic nude mice models showed that the overexpression of IP10 have significant correlations with larger tumor volume and less tumor necrosis after cisplatin treatment. In mechanism studies, IP10 overexpression was found to be well correlated with the activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling pathways in vitro and further validated in vivo models and in clinical specimens. IP10 neutralizing antibody was identified as a potential therapy which could sensitize cisplatin treatment in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions: The high expression of IP10 was identified in two cohorts of clinical samples and showed significant correlations with tumor recurrence. Graft injury induced IP10 overexpression could significantly increase cisplatin resistance after liver transplantation via ER stress signaling pathways. IP10 neutralizing antibody may be applied as an alternative treatment for recurrent HCC after liver transplantation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B50162731-
dc.subject.lcshChemokines.-
dc.subject.lcshCisplatin.-
dc.subject.lcshDrug resistance.-
dc.subject.lcshLiver - Transplantation.-
dc.subject.lcshLiver - Wounds and injuries.-
dc.titleThe role of interferon-gamma inducible protein 10 (IP10) in early-phase graft injury induced late-phase cisplatin resistance after livertransplantation-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb5016273-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSurgery-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b5016273-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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