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Book Chapter: Politicized challenges, depoliticized responses: Political monitoring in China's transitions

TitlePoliticized challenges, depoliticized responses: Political monitoring in China's transitions
Authors
KeywordsPolitical trial
Mass surveilance
Preemptive measures
Extra-law
Issue Date2013
PublisherRoutledge
Citation
Politicized Challenges, Depoliticized Responses: Political Monitoring In China’s Transitions. In Davis, F., McGarrity, N & Williams, G (Eds.), Surveillance, Counter-Terrorism and Comparative Constitutionalism, p. 296-312. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractHaving experienced a painful process of transition from revolution to modernization over the past 60 years, China now faces the mounting social, economic and political challenges that regularly face transition states. While the Chinese Communist Party-state proves to be resilient and able to adapt, innovate and evolve, it is also well-known that the social and economic transitions in China have produced significant strains on the political system. How does the Chinese state differ from the liberal democracies discussed in this volume in managing social and political risks? This paper examines the evolving strategies of political control in China. It points out the increasingly politicized challenges that the Chinese Communist Party faces and also offers an explanation for the reasons behind the politicization or the mainstreaming of politically motivated challenges. The paper then introduces the paradigmatic shift in the Party’s control strategy from open political repression to an apolitical, less ideological social management in regulating the increasingly politicized challenges.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182431
ISBN
SSRN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFu, H-
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-02T02:55:22Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-02T02:55:22Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationPoliticized Challenges, Depoliticized Responses: Political Monitoring In China’s Transitions. In Davis, F., McGarrity, N & Williams, G (Eds.), Surveillance, Counter-Terrorism and Comparative Constitutionalism, p. 296-312. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2013-
dc.identifier.isbn9780415829106-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182431-
dc.description.abstractHaving experienced a painful process of transition from revolution to modernization over the past 60 years, China now faces the mounting social, economic and political challenges that regularly face transition states. While the Chinese Communist Party-state proves to be resilient and able to adapt, innovate and evolve, it is also well-known that the social and economic transitions in China have produced significant strains on the political system. How does the Chinese state differ from the liberal democracies discussed in this volume in managing social and political risks? This paper examines the evolving strategies of political control in China. It points out the increasingly politicized challenges that the Chinese Communist Party faces and also offers an explanation for the reasons behind the politicization or the mainstreaming of politically motivated challenges. The paper then introduces the paradigmatic shift in the Party’s control strategy from open political repression to an apolitical, less ideological social management in regulating the increasingly politicized challenges.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge-
dc.relation.ispartofSurveillance, Counter-Terrorism and Comparative Constitutionalism-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPolitical trial-
dc.subjectMass surveilance-
dc.subjectPreemptive measures-
dc.subjectExtra-law-
dc.titlePoliticized challenges, depoliticized responses: Political monitoring in China's transitionsen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailFu, H: hlfu@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros224786-
dc.identifier.spage296-
dc.identifier.epage312-
dc.publisher.placeAbingdon, Oxon-
dc.identifier.ssrn2250073-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2013/014-

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