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postgraduate thesis: A study of late Qing collaborative translation

TitleA study of late Qing collaborative translation
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Yan, T. [甄芷婷]. (2011). A study of late Qing collaborative translation : the cases of Quanti xinlun, Daiweiji shiji and Huaxue jianyuan = Wan Qing he yi yan jiu : yi "Quan ti xin lun", "Dai wei ji shi ji", "Hua xue jian yuan" wei li. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4786935
AbstractCollaborative translation is one of the most practiced modes of intercultural communication in Late Qing as in the general history of China. While collaborative translation, as its prevalence suggests, is expected to have a direct and significant bearing on the way a translation is produced, little attention has been paid to the understanding of its nature, not least its influence on the shaping of translation products. The present study endeavors to explore collaborative translation with three specimens of acclaimed Late Qing translation. It will show that these translations, produced collaboratively by teams of Western and Chinese translator, are instilled with a fusion of the collaborator’s horizons, thus rendered as a hybrid monstrous both to the source and the target cultures. The first part of this thesis establishes the conceptual paradigm from which a probe into the general practices of Late Qing collaborative translation derives. It argues that collaborative translation, which generally operates as a cooperation between a bilingual foreign translator and a monolingual local translator, allows considerable latitude for the local translator to participate in the transference and building of exotic knowledge, bringing about hybridity to the translation products. Resting upon the premise of hybridity, the second part of this thesis conducts close analyses of the selected translations on medicine, mathematics and chemistry, namely Quanti Xinlun, Daiweiji Shiji and Huaxue Jianyuan. By reconstructing the actual manner of operation through which these translations were produced, and by examining how certain fundamental concepts of modern Western sciences were rendered into Chinese, this part forms a critical study of the agency of the Chinese translator, who, as will be shown, selectively interprets and reshapes the body of knowledge to be transmitted in a direction presumably unintended by his Western counterpart, thereby creating a hybrid materialized as a blend of horizons between the two collaborators, and in consequence a new entity of scientific concepts different from those in the West and in China. The purpose of this study, that is to say, is to explore the agency of translators in the act of translation by positing collaborative translation as a site of observation, where cultural entanglement is both theoretically and empirically conspicuous. It is hoped that this study will on one hand foster our understanding of collaborative translation in Late Qing, and on the other, reveal further the agency of translators in intercultural communication.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectTranslating and interpreting - China.
Dept/ProgramChinese

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYan, Tsz-ting.-
dc.contributor.author甄芷婷.-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationYan, T. [甄芷婷]. (2011). A study of late Qing collaborative translation : the cases of Quanti xinlun, Daiweiji shiji and Huaxue jianyuan = Wan Qing he yi yan jiu : yi "Quan ti xin lun", "Dai wei ji shi ji", "Hua xue jian yuan" wei li. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4786935-
dc.description.abstractCollaborative translation is one of the most practiced modes of intercultural communication in Late Qing as in the general history of China. While collaborative translation, as its prevalence suggests, is expected to have a direct and significant bearing on the way a translation is produced, little attention has been paid to the understanding of its nature, not least its influence on the shaping of translation products. The present study endeavors to explore collaborative translation with three specimens of acclaimed Late Qing translation. It will show that these translations, produced collaboratively by teams of Western and Chinese translator, are instilled with a fusion of the collaborator’s horizons, thus rendered as a hybrid monstrous both to the source and the target cultures. The first part of this thesis establishes the conceptual paradigm from which a probe into the general practices of Late Qing collaborative translation derives. It argues that collaborative translation, which generally operates as a cooperation between a bilingual foreign translator and a monolingual local translator, allows considerable latitude for the local translator to participate in the transference and building of exotic knowledge, bringing about hybridity to the translation products. Resting upon the premise of hybridity, the second part of this thesis conducts close analyses of the selected translations on medicine, mathematics and chemistry, namely Quanti Xinlun, Daiweiji Shiji and Huaxue Jianyuan. By reconstructing the actual manner of operation through which these translations were produced, and by examining how certain fundamental concepts of modern Western sciences were rendered into Chinese, this part forms a critical study of the agency of the Chinese translator, who, as will be shown, selectively interprets and reshapes the body of knowledge to be transmitted in a direction presumably unintended by his Western counterpart, thereby creating a hybrid materialized as a blend of horizons between the two collaborators, and in consequence a new entity of scientific concepts different from those in the West and in China. The purpose of this study, that is to say, is to explore the agency of translators in the act of translation by positing collaborative translation as a site of observation, where cultural entanglement is both theoretically and empirically conspicuous. It is hoped that this study will on one hand foster our understanding of collaborative translation in Late Qing, and on the other, reveal further the agency of translators in intercultural communication.-
dc.languagechi-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47869355-
dc.subject.lcshTranslating and interpreting - China.-
dc.titleA study of late Qing collaborative translation-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4786935-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineChinese-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4786935-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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