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Conference Paper: Years of life lost associated with deaths of patients with laboratory-confirmed 2009 Pandemic (H1N1) virus infection in Hong Kong in 2009

TitleYears of life lost associated with deaths of patients with laboratory-confirmed 2009 Pandemic (H1N1) virus infection in Hong Kong in 2009
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherISIRV.
Citation
ISIRV International Conference on Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza, Munich, Germany, 5-8 September 2012. Incidence, Severity, and Impact 2012: poster presentations, 2012, p. 38-39, abstract S2-P34 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: While the overall mortality impact of the first wave of the 2009 pandemic appeared to be lower than in most annual seasonal epidemics, mortality among children was thought to be higher. Years of life lost (YLL) has therefore been proposed as an alternative measure of the impact of influenza epidemics and pandemics. However, reported estimates of YLL have typically ignored the presence of underlying chronic conditions or health risk factors in most individuals who died. METHODS: Data were available on patients in Hong Kong with laboratory-confirmed 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection who died between May 2009 and March 2010. The YLL for each confirmed death was estimated based on the remaining life expectancy at the age at death, which was based on the 2009 Hong Kong life tables for males and females. For each confirmed death with documented underlying conditions or a health-risk behavior, such as smoking, the YLL was corrected with hazard-based modifications to the life tables to account for reduced life expectancy in those individuals. RESULTS: There were 72 deaths among patients with laboratory-confirmed 2009 influenza A(H1N1) virus infection. Patient ages ranged from 0-95 years of age, and 56% had underlying health conditions or risk behavior that reduced their life expectancy. We estimated that the 2009 pandemic was associated with 1560 YLL (95% confidence interval, 1410-1700 YLL), adjusted for chronic conditions and health risk behaviors. This estimate of YLL was 25% less than the naive estimate of YLL ignoring chronic conditions and health risk behavior and using only the sex-specific life expectancy at age of death. On average, the life expectancy was reduced by 50% for patients with chronic conditions or health risk behaviors. CONCLUSION: Our estimates of the YLL corrected for chronic conditions and health-risk behaviors provide a framework for similar calculations elsewhere. Our analysis demonstrates the potential scale of bias in YLL estimation if chronic conditions are ignored.
DescriptionPoster Presentations: S2-P34
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182167

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, EHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorIp, DKMen_US
dc.contributor.authorNishiura, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorSeto, WHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-17T07:28:09Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-17T07:28:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationISIRV International Conference on Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza, Munich, Germany, 5-8 September 2012. Incidence, Severity, and Impact 2012: poster presentations, 2012, p. 38-39, abstract S2-P34en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182167-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentations: S2-P34-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: While the overall mortality impact of the first wave of the 2009 pandemic appeared to be lower than in most annual seasonal epidemics, mortality among children was thought to be higher. Years of life lost (YLL) has therefore been proposed as an alternative measure of the impact of influenza epidemics and pandemics. However, reported estimates of YLL have typically ignored the presence of underlying chronic conditions or health risk factors in most individuals who died. METHODS: Data were available on patients in Hong Kong with laboratory-confirmed 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection who died between May 2009 and March 2010. The YLL for each confirmed death was estimated based on the remaining life expectancy at the age at death, which was based on the 2009 Hong Kong life tables for males and females. For each confirmed death with documented underlying conditions or a health-risk behavior, such as smoking, the YLL was corrected with hazard-based modifications to the life tables to account for reduced life expectancy in those individuals. RESULTS: There were 72 deaths among patients with laboratory-confirmed 2009 influenza A(H1N1) virus infection. Patient ages ranged from 0-95 years of age, and 56% had underlying health conditions or risk behavior that reduced their life expectancy. We estimated that the 2009 pandemic was associated with 1560 YLL (95% confidence interval, 1410-1700 YLL), adjusted for chronic conditions and health risk behaviors. This estimate of YLL was 25% less than the naive estimate of YLL ignoring chronic conditions and health risk behavior and using only the sex-specific life expectancy at age of death. On average, the life expectancy was reduced by 50% for patients with chronic conditions or health risk behaviors. CONCLUSION: Our estimates of the YLL corrected for chronic conditions and health-risk behaviors provide a framework for similar calculations elsewhere. Our analysis demonstrates the potential scale of bias in YLL estimation if chronic conditions are ignored.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherISIRV.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofIncidence, Severity, and Impact 2012: poster presentationsen_US
dc.titleYears of life lost associated with deaths of patients with laboratory-confirmed 2009 Pandemic (H1N1) virus infection in Hong Kong in 2009en_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhou, Y: yingzhou@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCowling, BJ: bcowling@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, EHY: ehylau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailIp, DKM: dkmip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailNishiura, H: nishiura@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSeto, WH: whseto@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCowling, BJ=rp01326en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, EHY=rp01349en_US
dc.identifier.authorityIp, DKM=rp00256en_US
dc.identifier.authorityNishiura, H=rp01488en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros213763en_US
dc.identifier.spage38en_US
dc.identifier.epage39en_US
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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