File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL
Supplementary

Conference Paper: Saliva flow and oral Candida colonization in Sjögren’s syndrome patients

TitleSaliva flow and oral Candida colonization in Sjögren’s syndrome patients
Authors
KeywordsFungi
Saliva
Salivary dysfunction and Sjögren's Syndrome
Issue Date2012
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The Annual Meeting of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Southeast Asian Division, Hong Kong, China, 3-4 November 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91 n. Special Issue C: abstract no. 168864 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between oral Candida colonization and salivary flow in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome (SS). Methods: 85 SS patients (83 females and 2 males; 38 primary (pSS) and 47 secondary cases (sSS)) were recruited from the Rheumatology Clinics, Queen Mary Hospital and Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong. Flow rates of unstimulated (UWS) and stimulated (SWS) whole saliva were measured. Oral rinse and dental plaque samples were collected and streaked onto Sabouraud’s dextrose agar (SDA) and CHROMagar plates. All plates were incubated at 37°C in air for 2 days. Candida colony-forming unit (CFU) was recorded. Species identification was based on colony morphology, Gram-staining reaction and biochemical analysis using API ID 32C system. Results: More than 60% of SS patients had oral Candida. Prevalence of oral Candidain oral rinse and dental plaque samples of SS patients was 63.5% and 68.2% respectively. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated Candida species, contributing to 52.9% and 57.6% of total Candida in the oral rinse and dental plaque samples respectively. There were mixed colonization of oral Candidain 12.9 % (oral rinse samples) and 11.8 % (dental plaque samples) of patients. The UWS and SWS flow rates were 0.23 ml/min (SD=0.24) and 0.47 ml/min (SD=0.51) respectively. A negative correlation existed between the UWS flow and Candida counts in oral rinse (r=-0.70, p<0.001) and dental plaque samples(r=-0.71, p<0.001). Likewise, SWS flow was inversely correlated with Candida counts in oral rinse (r=-0.66, p<0.001) and dental plaque samples(r=-0.65, p<0.001). Conclusions: SS patients had reduced salivary output and were prevalent to oral Candida colonization. There were inverse relationships between salivary flow rates and Candida counts. (Funded by Hong Kong Research Grants Council, GRF Grant #769408M)
DescriptionSession: Behavioral, Epidemiologic and Health Services Research
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182075
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXin, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KCMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-17T07:20:47Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-17T07:20:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Annual Meeting of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Southeast Asian Division, Hong Kong, China, 3-4 November 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91 n. Special Issue C: abstract no. 168864en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/182075-
dc.descriptionSession: Behavioral, Epidemiologic and Health Services Research-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between oral Candida colonization and salivary flow in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome (SS). Methods: 85 SS patients (83 females and 2 males; 38 primary (pSS) and 47 secondary cases (sSS)) were recruited from the Rheumatology Clinics, Queen Mary Hospital and Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong. Flow rates of unstimulated (UWS) and stimulated (SWS) whole saliva were measured. Oral rinse and dental plaque samples were collected and streaked onto Sabouraud’s dextrose agar (SDA) and CHROMagar plates. All plates were incubated at 37°C in air for 2 days. Candida colony-forming unit (CFU) was recorded. Species identification was based on colony morphology, Gram-staining reaction and biochemical analysis using API ID 32C system. Results: More than 60% of SS patients had oral Candida. Prevalence of oral Candidain oral rinse and dental plaque samples of SS patients was 63.5% and 68.2% respectively. Candida albicans was the most frequently isolated Candida species, contributing to 52.9% and 57.6% of total Candida in the oral rinse and dental plaque samples respectively. There were mixed colonization of oral Candidain 12.9 % (oral rinse samples) and 11.8 % (dental plaque samples) of patients. The UWS and SWS flow rates were 0.23 ml/min (SD=0.24) and 0.47 ml/min (SD=0.51) respectively. A negative correlation existed between the UWS flow and Candida counts in oral rinse (r=-0.70, p<0.001) and dental plaque samples(r=-0.71, p<0.001). Likewise, SWS flow was inversely correlated with Candida counts in oral rinse (r=-0.66, p<0.001) and dental plaque samples(r=-0.65, p<0.001). Conclusions: SS patients had reduced salivary output and were prevalent to oral Candida colonization. There were inverse relationships between salivary flow rates and Candida counts. (Funded by Hong Kong Research Grants Council, GRF Grant #769408M)-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc..en_US
dc.subjectFungi-
dc.subjectSaliva-
dc.subjectSalivary dysfunction and Sjögren's Syndrome-
dc.titleSaliva flow and oral Candida colonization in Sjögren’s syndrome patientsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KCM: kcmleung@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KCM=rp00032en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros213939en_US
dc.identifier.volume91en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue C: abstract no. 168864en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats