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Conference Paper: Oral opportunistic pathogens in patients with stroke following hospital discharge

TitleOral opportunistic pathogens in patients with stroke following hospital discharge
Authors
KeywordsCardiovascular disease
Microbiology
Issue Date2013
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The 2013 IADR/AADR/CADR General Session and Exhibition, Seattle, WA., 20-23 March 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 Spec Iss B, p. 3682 How to Cite?
AbstractOral opportunistic pathogens are associated with nosocomial infections, and are highly prevalent in hospitalized patients with stroke. The time course of oral carriage following discharge from the hospital environment, however, warrants further investigation. Objectives: An observational study was conducted to monitor oral opportunistic pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, aerobic and facultatively anaerobic Gram negative bacilli (AGNB), and yeasts prior to hospital discharge, and after six months. Methods: Concentrated oral rinse and imprint samples were collected from patients following stroke in a rehabilitation ward prior to hospital discharge, and six months later, for detection of S. aureus, AGNB, and yeasts. Patients had previously been recruited to an in-hospital oral health promotion program. The development of infectious complications was also monitored following discharge. S. aureus were identified with Staph Slidex Plus. Yeasts and AGNB were identified with ID32C and API20E/API20NE, respectively. Results: A total of 52 patients were reviewed at six months. While AGNB prevalence prior to discharge (80.8%) was significantly reduced (p=0.001), half of the patients (51.9%) remained colonized at six months. No significant changes were observed in percentage frequencies of S. aureus (51.9%) and yeast (55.8%) detected prior to discharge. Viable counts (cfu/ml) of AGNB (p<0.001) and yeast (p=0.028) were significantly reduced at six months. Pneumonia and subsequent mortality was documented for two patients, in which detectable viable counts of opportunistic pathogens (6.4x105cfu/ml, 3.6x104cfu/ml) were also among the highest observed prior to discharge. Conclusions: Oral opportunistic pathogens remain highly prevalent in patients with stroke up to six months following hospital discharge. Further evaluation and identification of optimal oral health promotion interventions in this patient group is required.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181970
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, OLTen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, ASen_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, LSWen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, CPJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-17T07:15:30Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-17T07:15:30Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2013 IADR/AADR/CADR General Session and Exhibition, Seattle, WA., 20-23 March 2013. In Journal of Dental Research, 2013, v. 92 Spec Iss B, p. 3682en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181970-
dc.description.abstractOral opportunistic pathogens are associated with nosocomial infections, and are highly prevalent in hospitalized patients with stroke. The time course of oral carriage following discharge from the hospital environment, however, warrants further investigation. Objectives: An observational study was conducted to monitor oral opportunistic pathogens including Staphylococcus aureus, aerobic and facultatively anaerobic Gram negative bacilli (AGNB), and yeasts prior to hospital discharge, and after six months. Methods: Concentrated oral rinse and imprint samples were collected from patients following stroke in a rehabilitation ward prior to hospital discharge, and six months later, for detection of S. aureus, AGNB, and yeasts. Patients had previously been recruited to an in-hospital oral health promotion program. The development of infectious complications was also monitored following discharge. S. aureus were identified with Staph Slidex Plus. Yeasts and AGNB were identified with ID32C and API20E/API20NE, respectively. Results: A total of 52 patients were reviewed at six months. While AGNB prevalence prior to discharge (80.8%) was significantly reduced (p=0.001), half of the patients (51.9%) remained colonized at six months. No significant changes were observed in percentage frequencies of S. aureus (51.9%) and yeast (55.8%) detected prior to discharge. Viable counts (cfu/ml) of AGNB (p<0.001) and yeast (p=0.028) were significantly reduced at six months. Pneumonia and subsequent mortality was documented for two patients, in which detectable viable counts of opportunistic pathogens (6.4x105cfu/ml, 3.6x104cfu/ml) were also among the highest observed prior to discharge. Conclusions: Oral opportunistic pathogens remain highly prevalent in patients with stroke up to six months following hospital discharge. Further evaluation and identification of optimal oral health promotion interventions in this patient group is required.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc..en_US
dc.subjectCardiovascular disease-
dc.subjectMicrobiology-
dc.titleOral opportunistic pathogens in patients with stroke following hospital dischargeen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-0345&volume=92 &issue=Spec Iss B&spage=3682&epage=&date=2013&atitle=Oral+opportunistic+pathogens+in+patients+with+stroke+following+hospital+dischargeen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, OLT: ottolam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcMillan, AS: annemcmillan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP: lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, CPJ: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, OLT=rp01567en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcMillan, AS=rp00014en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, CPJ=rp00037en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros213862en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros214402-
dc.identifier.volume92en_US
dc.identifier.issueSpec Iss Ben_US
dc.identifier.spage3682en_US
dc.identifier.epage3682en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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