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postgraduate thesis: Explaining public-private partnerships in China: case study of primary land development in Beijing

TitleExplaining public-private partnerships in China: case study of primary land development in Beijing
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Zhang, X. [张弦]. (2011). Explaining public-private partnerships in China : case study of primary land development in Beijing. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4784936
AbstractPublic-private partnership (PPP) has been an important issue in recent decades. PPP is seen by some as a cure for inefficient and over-burdensome modern government. Yet, by observing practices in China, this research aims to answer the simple questions: why has there been a decline in PPPs? How does government decide whether or not to establish partnership with private enterprises? By investigating the case of Primary Land Development (PLD) in China especially in Beijing, this research has attempted to provide explanations mainly in relation to coordination effectiveness involving a resource interdependence theory. Logic of institutionalism is followed. External environment, key institutions and attributes of PLD field are also carefully examined to further explain the change of resources and coordination effectiveness. This research conducts longitudinal comparison of cases within one case city: Beijing. The focal level is Beijing municipal level. Three time horizons are examined, which are 2002—2004, 2005—2008, and 2009-2010. The First-hand data in this study have two main sources: in-depth interviews with key policy participants and archives acquired through fieldwork. Secondary data including statistical yearbooks, laws and policies, news, and research carried out by previous students are also employed by the research. This research examines the changes of external political and economic environment in each time horizon. It compares the coordination effectiveness between PLD policy-makers and PLD implementers and between PLD implementers and other stakeholders in PLD process within each time period. Through examining the three stages of PLD in Beijing, this research develops the following findings. First, fiscal decentralization and cadre management are two important elements shaping the incentives of policy-makers in China. Second, coordination effectiveness in two dimensions influence policy-makers in decisions related to PPP. Third, the degree and the extent of resource interdependence influences whether coordinator can employ the most suitable and effective mechanisms to coordinate. Fourth, changes to the external economic and political environment will change the incentives and policy choices of policy-makers, and also change the resources held by different actors. Fifth, coordination matters. When traditional mechanisms such as hierarchy and the market do not work well in many cases, the ability to employ new coordination mechanisms such as networks is particularly important in achieving the desired goals of coordinators. Finally, in countries like China which is dominated by political logic, the more politically significant a field is, the less likely it is that PPPs will exist.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectPublic-private sector cooperation - China - Beijing.
Land use, Urban - China - Beijing.
Dept/ProgramPolitics and Public Administration

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Xian-
dc.contributor.author张弦-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationZhang, X. [张弦]. (2011). Explaining public-private partnerships in China : case study of primary land development in Beijing. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4784936-
dc.description.abstractPublic-private partnership (PPP) has been an important issue in recent decades. PPP is seen by some as a cure for inefficient and over-burdensome modern government. Yet, by observing practices in China, this research aims to answer the simple questions: why has there been a decline in PPPs? How does government decide whether or not to establish partnership with private enterprises? By investigating the case of Primary Land Development (PLD) in China especially in Beijing, this research has attempted to provide explanations mainly in relation to coordination effectiveness involving a resource interdependence theory. Logic of institutionalism is followed. External environment, key institutions and attributes of PLD field are also carefully examined to further explain the change of resources and coordination effectiveness. This research conducts longitudinal comparison of cases within one case city: Beijing. The focal level is Beijing municipal level. Three time horizons are examined, which are 2002—2004, 2005—2008, and 2009-2010. The First-hand data in this study have two main sources: in-depth interviews with key policy participants and archives acquired through fieldwork. Secondary data including statistical yearbooks, laws and policies, news, and research carried out by previous students are also employed by the research. This research examines the changes of external political and economic environment in each time horizon. It compares the coordination effectiveness between PLD policy-makers and PLD implementers and between PLD implementers and other stakeholders in PLD process within each time period. Through examining the three stages of PLD in Beijing, this research develops the following findings. First, fiscal decentralization and cadre management are two important elements shaping the incentives of policy-makers in China. Second, coordination effectiveness in two dimensions influence policy-makers in decisions related to PPP. Third, the degree and the extent of resource interdependence influences whether coordinator can employ the most suitable and effective mechanisms to coordinate. Fourth, changes to the external economic and political environment will change the incentives and policy choices of policy-makers, and also change the resources held by different actors. Fifth, coordination matters. When traditional mechanisms such as hierarchy and the market do not work well in many cases, the ability to employ new coordination mechanisms such as networks is particularly important in achieving the desired goals of coordinators. Finally, in countries like China which is dominated by political logic, the more politically significant a field is, the less likely it is that PPPs will exist.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47849368-
dc.subject.lcshPublic-private sector cooperation - China - Beijing.-
dc.subject.lcshLand use, Urban - China - Beijing.-
dc.titleExplaining public-private partnerships in China: case study of primary land development in Beijing-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4784936-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePolitics and Public Administration-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4784936-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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