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Article: Author manifestation and perceptions of self in Chinese academic discourse: Comparisons with English

TitleAuthor manifestation and perceptions of self in Chinese academic discourse: Comparisons with English
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Benjamins.
Citation
Languages in Contrast, 2013, v. 13 n. 1, p. 91-113 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper examines the manifestation of authorial identity in Chinese-language research articles by contrasting the phenomenon with English across three fields. The study seeks to find patterns governing the use of self-mention devices among native Chinese writers, and to explain such patterns in terms of the Chinese perception of self. Based on a corpus-based investigation of pronominal and depersonalized forms of self-mention involving 180 research articles, the paper suggests that Chinese authors have a stronger tendency to use depersonalized forms than pronominal forms. It is also found that in using first-person pronouns, Chinese authors in single-authored papers have a salient preference for the plural form, in particular the inclusive plural pronoun. The paper attempts to link the linguistic phenomenon to the concept of the ‘interdependent self’ inherent in Chinese social psychology and proposes possible applications to research in bilingual scholarly writing and academic translation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181818

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, TKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-19T04:00:05Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-19T04:00:05Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationLanguages in Contrast, 2013, v. 13 n. 1, p. 91-113en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181818-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the manifestation of authorial identity in Chinese-language research articles by contrasting the phenomenon with English across three fields. The study seeks to find patterns governing the use of self-mention devices among native Chinese writers, and to explain such patterns in terms of the Chinese perception of self. Based on a corpus-based investigation of pronominal and depersonalized forms of self-mention involving 180 research articles, the paper suggests that Chinese authors have a stronger tendency to use depersonalized forms than pronominal forms. It is also found that in using first-person pronouns, Chinese authors in single-authored papers have a salient preference for the plural form, in particular the inclusive plural pronoun. The paper attempts to link the linguistic phenomenon to the concept of the ‘interdependent self’ inherent in Chinese social psychology and proposes possible applications to research in bilingual scholarly writing and academic translation.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Benjamins.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofLanguages in Contrasten_US
dc.titleAuthor manifestation and perceptions of self in Chinese academic discourse: Comparisons with Englishen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, TK: leetk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TK=rp01612en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros213431en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros213492-
dc.identifier.hkuros213601-
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage91en_US
dc.identifier.epage113en_US

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