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postgraduate thesis: The acculturation experiences and adaptation of Pakistanis and Nepalese in Hong Kong

TitleThe acculturation experiences and adaptation of Pakistanis and Nepalese in Hong Kong
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Tse, SSK
Issue Date2013
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Tonsing, K. N.. (2013). The acculturation experiences and adaptation of Pakistanis and Nepalese in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4979953
AbstractResearch on acculturation has been evolving over the past few decades; however, with very limited research focusing on the acculturation experiences of South Asians in the Hong Kong context, this study helps to fill the research gap by examining the acculturation experiences and adaptation of Pakistani and Nepalese adults in Hong Kong. The dearth of information on the acculturation process of South Asians prevents us from fully comprehending the factors that facilitate or impede their adaptation. By incorporating Berry’s acculturation research and Ward and colleagues’ work on adaptation as the theoretical framework, this study investigated important psychosocial constructs such as the impact of acculturation orientation, perceived discrimination, acculturation stress and social support on psychological and sociocultural adaptation. This study adopts both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Using a cross-sectional research design in the first part of the study, data was collected by means of convenience sampling from a total of 402 Pakistani and Nepalese first-generation adults. Two focus groups were then established after preliminary analyses of the quantitative results, providing more in-depth understanding and context-specific explanation in interpreting relationships among variables. Moreover, the focus groups also provided the opportunity for study participants to augment and supplement the quantitative data. Quantitative data were analyzed with a series of analysis of variance and hierarchical regression analysis. The results of this study highlighted the levels of complexity apparent in the dynamic process of acculturation among Pakistani and Nepalese immigrants in Hong Kong. For the Nepalese, factors such as integration strategy, higher level of orientation towards the host and heritage culture, as well as perceived social support, were significant predictors for life satisfaction. Acculturation orientation to the heritage culture, the separation strategy, and acculturative stress were significantly associated with psychological distress. On the other hand, sociocultural adaptation was more predicted by the acculturation orientation to the host culture and the heritage culture, the integration strategy, acculturative stress and perceived discrimination. Marginalization strategy was associated with lower life satisfaction, higher psychological distress and more difficulties in sociocultural adaptation. For Pakistanis, gender and perceived social support were indicative of life satisfaction, whereas perceived discrimination and acculturative stress emerged as significant predictors of psychological distress. Sociocultural adaptation was more strongly predicted by education level, proficiency of the host language, the integration strategy, perceived discrimination and acculturative stress. The marginalization strategy showed significant negative effects on sociocultural adaptation. Acculturative stress and perceived discrimination both had direct and indirect effect on adaptation outcomes that were partially mediated by perceived social support. This observation highlights the important role that social support plays in both acculturation and adaptation processes. Additionally, the focus group data analyses revealed that education for their children is an important area of concerns among the study participants. With the findings of this study, implications for practice and policy for South Asians are also presented. The methodological and research limitations and the directions for future research are discussed.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectAcculturation - China - Hong Kong.
Pakistanis - China - Hong Kong - Social conditions.
Nepalese - China - Hong Kong - Social conditions.
Dept/ProgramSocial Work and Social Administration
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181519

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorTse, SSK-
dc.contributor.authorTonsing, Kareen Ninglianching.-
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-03T03:20:46Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-03T03:20:46Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationTonsing, K. N.. (2013). The acculturation experiences and adaptation of Pakistanis and Nepalese in Hong Kong. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4979953-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181519-
dc.description.abstractResearch on acculturation has been evolving over the past few decades; however, with very limited research focusing on the acculturation experiences of South Asians in the Hong Kong context, this study helps to fill the research gap by examining the acculturation experiences and adaptation of Pakistani and Nepalese adults in Hong Kong. The dearth of information on the acculturation process of South Asians prevents us from fully comprehending the factors that facilitate or impede their adaptation. By incorporating Berry’s acculturation research and Ward and colleagues’ work on adaptation as the theoretical framework, this study investigated important psychosocial constructs such as the impact of acculturation orientation, perceived discrimination, acculturation stress and social support on psychological and sociocultural adaptation. This study adopts both quantitative and qualitative approaches. Using a cross-sectional research design in the first part of the study, data was collected by means of convenience sampling from a total of 402 Pakistani and Nepalese first-generation adults. Two focus groups were then established after preliminary analyses of the quantitative results, providing more in-depth understanding and context-specific explanation in interpreting relationships among variables. Moreover, the focus groups also provided the opportunity for study participants to augment and supplement the quantitative data. Quantitative data were analyzed with a series of analysis of variance and hierarchical regression analysis. The results of this study highlighted the levels of complexity apparent in the dynamic process of acculturation among Pakistani and Nepalese immigrants in Hong Kong. For the Nepalese, factors such as integration strategy, higher level of orientation towards the host and heritage culture, as well as perceived social support, were significant predictors for life satisfaction. Acculturation orientation to the heritage culture, the separation strategy, and acculturative stress were significantly associated with psychological distress. On the other hand, sociocultural adaptation was more predicted by the acculturation orientation to the host culture and the heritage culture, the integration strategy, acculturative stress and perceived discrimination. Marginalization strategy was associated with lower life satisfaction, higher psychological distress and more difficulties in sociocultural adaptation. For Pakistanis, gender and perceived social support were indicative of life satisfaction, whereas perceived discrimination and acculturative stress emerged as significant predictors of psychological distress. Sociocultural adaptation was more strongly predicted by education level, proficiency of the host language, the integration strategy, perceived discrimination and acculturative stress. The marginalization strategy showed significant negative effects on sociocultural adaptation. Acculturative stress and perceived discrimination both had direct and indirect effect on adaptation outcomes that were partially mediated by perceived social support. This observation highlights the important role that social support plays in both acculturation and adaptation processes. Additionally, the focus group data analyses revealed that education for their children is an important area of concerns among the study participants. With the findings of this study, implications for practice and policy for South Asians are also presented. The methodological and research limitations and the directions for future research are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B49799538-
dc.subject.lcshAcculturation - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.subject.lcshPakistanis - China - Hong Kong - Social conditions.-
dc.subject.lcshNepalese - China - Hong Kong - Social conditions.-
dc.titleThe acculturation experiences and adaptation of Pakistanis and Nepalese in Hong Kong-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4979953-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineSocial Work and Social Administration-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4979953-
dc.date.hkucongregation2013-

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