File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Allele and genotype frequencies of polymorphic FMO3 gene in two genetically distinct populations

TitleAllele and genotype frequencies of polymorphic FMO3 gene in two genetically distinct populations
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0263-6484/
Citation
Cell Biochemistry And Function, 2007, v. 25 n. 4, p. 443-453 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aims of this study were to analyze flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) polymorphisms and allele and genotype frequencies in 256 Han Chinese and 50 African-American individuals, to compare the allele and genotype frequencies of these populations with those of other world populations. For Han Chinese, genotyping of three common single nucleotide polymorphisms, E158K, V257M and E308G was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). For African-Americans, genotyping of all coding exons was performed by modified PCR-single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP). Evolutionary rates of FMO3 were estimated computationally. We found that there were significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies among Han Chinese, African-Americans and other world populations. In Han Chinese, the minor allele frequencies (MAFs) were 0.229 (E158K), 0.203 (V257M) and 0.148 (E308G), respectively. In African-Americans, MAFs were 0.48 (E158K), 0.05 (V257M) and 0 (E308G), respectively. There was rapid evolution during the divergence of primate FMO3. This is the first report comparing FMO alleles and genotypes between Han Chinese and African-Americans. A Han Chinese population database has been established for three gene polymorphisms. The data presented here justify further pharmacogenetic studies for potentially optimizing recommended drug dosages and evaluating relationships with disease processes. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181211
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.016
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.887
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHao, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorFurnes, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorSchlenk, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-21T02:02:51Z-
dc.date.available2013-02-21T02:02:51Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationCell Biochemistry And Function, 2007, v. 25 n. 4, p. 443-453en_US
dc.identifier.issn0263-6484en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181211-
dc.description.abstractThe aims of this study were to analyze flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) polymorphisms and allele and genotype frequencies in 256 Han Chinese and 50 African-American individuals, to compare the allele and genotype frequencies of these populations with those of other world populations. For Han Chinese, genotyping of three common single nucleotide polymorphisms, E158K, V257M and E308G was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). For African-Americans, genotyping of all coding exons was performed by modified PCR-single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP). Evolutionary rates of FMO3 were estimated computationally. We found that there were significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies among Han Chinese, African-Americans and other world populations. In Han Chinese, the minor allele frequencies (MAFs) were 0.229 (E158K), 0.203 (V257M) and 0.148 (E308G), respectively. In African-Americans, MAFs were 0.48 (E158K), 0.05 (V257M) and 0 (E308G), respectively. There was rapid evolution during the divergence of primate FMO3. This is the first report comparing FMO alleles and genotypes between Han Chinese and African-Americans. A Han Chinese population database has been established for three gene polymorphisms. The data presented here justify further pharmacogenetic studies for potentially optimizing recommended drug dosages and evaluating relationships with disease processes. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0263-6484/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofCell Biochemistry and Functionen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAfrican Americans - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Frequencyen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOxygenases - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Single Nucleotideen_US
dc.titleAllele and genotype frequencies of polymorphic FMO3 gene in two genetically distinct populationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, M: mxli@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, M=rp01722en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/cbf.1326en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16598836-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34447501922en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34447501922&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage443en_US
dc.identifier.epage453en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248157500014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHao, D=13607520900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, J=7410370879en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFurnes, B=7801345512en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchlenk, D=7006018368en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, M=17135391100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, S=7406945313en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, L=8421266200en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats