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Conference Paper: Does social support mean differently for cancer patients and their family caregivers? A cross-sectional study in a Chinese community

TitleDoes social support mean differently for cancer patients and their family caregivers? A cross-sectional study in a Chinese community
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1743-7563/issues
Citation
The 39th COSA Annual Scientific Meeting and 14th IPOS World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, Brisbane, Australia, 13–15 November 2012. In Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2012, v. 8 suppl. S3, p. 265, abstract no. 541 How to Cite?
AbstractAIMS: Social support is often cited as a protective factor against stress for both cancer patients and their family caregivers, although existing literature focus on social support perceived either by patients or by caregivers alone. Little is known about the role of social support in a patient-caregiver dyad in mediating stress and mental health outcome. This study aimed to explore whether patient’s perceived social support is associated with caregiver’s mental well-being, and vice versa. METHOD: 236 pairs of Chinese cancer patients and their family caregivers completed questionnaires on their perceived social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support), perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and self-reported mental health (Short Form-12). RESULTS: Perceived social support reported by cancer patients correlated significantly with that by their caregivers (support from friends: r = 0.474; support from family: r = 0.432). Regression analyses with caregiver’s and patient’s perceived social support entered as possible predictors showed that (a) patient’s own perceived support from family and friends were associated with patient’s mental health (betas = 0.160 and 0.267), mood (betas = −0.303 and −0.275), and perceived stress (betas = −0.364 and −0.148); (b) caregiver’s own perceived family support was the only significant association with mental health (beta = 0.192) and mood (beta = −0.254); and (c) caregiver’s perceived stress was associated with perceived family support reported both by own and by patient (betas = −0.156 and −0.203). CONCLUSION: The current findings suggest that while Chinese cancer patients with support from either friends or family cope better, for caregivers it is family support that appears to have the protective effect. Patient-reported family support, presumably a proxy index of patient-caregiver relationship, appears to affect caregiver’s stress.
DescriptionConference Theme: Impact Through Translation: Cancer Research
This journal suppl. is Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho–Oncology ... 2012
Poster abstracts
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181149
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWan, AHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, THYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PPYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-19T11:38:07Z-
dc.date.available2013-02-19T11:38:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 39th COSA Annual Scientific Meeting and 14th IPOS World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, Brisbane, Australia, 13–15 November 2012. In Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2012, v. 8 suppl. S3, p. 265, abstract no. 541en_US
dc.identifier.issn1743-7563 (Online)-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181149-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Impact Through Translation: Cancer Research-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. is Special Issue: Abstracts of the Joint Meeting of the COSA 39th Annual Scientific Meeting and IPOS 14th World Congress of Psycho–Oncology ... 2012-
dc.descriptionPoster abstracts-
dc.description.abstractAIMS: Social support is often cited as a protective factor against stress for both cancer patients and their family caregivers, although existing literature focus on social support perceived either by patients or by caregivers alone. Little is known about the role of social support in a patient-caregiver dyad in mediating stress and mental health outcome. This study aimed to explore whether patient’s perceived social support is associated with caregiver’s mental well-being, and vice versa. METHOD: 236 pairs of Chinese cancer patients and their family caregivers completed questionnaires on their perceived social support (Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support), perceived stress (Perceived Stress Scale), mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and self-reported mental health (Short Form-12). RESULTS: Perceived social support reported by cancer patients correlated significantly with that by their caregivers (support from friends: r = 0.474; support from family: r = 0.432). Regression analyses with caregiver’s and patient’s perceived social support entered as possible predictors showed that (a) patient’s own perceived support from family and friends were associated with patient’s mental health (betas = 0.160 and 0.267), mood (betas = −0.303 and −0.275), and perceived stress (betas = −0.364 and −0.148); (b) caregiver’s own perceived family support was the only significant association with mental health (beta = 0.192) and mood (beta = −0.254); and (c) caregiver’s perceived stress was associated with perceived family support reported both by own and by patient (betas = −0.156 and −0.203). CONCLUSION: The current findings suggest that while Chinese cancer patients with support from either friends or family cope better, for caregivers it is family support that appears to have the protective effect. Patient-reported family support, presumably a proxy index of patient-caregiver relationship, appears to affect caregiver’s stress.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1743-7563/issues-
dc.relation.ispartofAsia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncologyen_US
dc.rightsAsia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc..-
dc.titleDoes social support mean differently for cancer patients and their family caregivers? A cross-sectional study in a Chinese communityen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWan, AHY: awan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, THY: chanhangyee@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, JSM: chansm5@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, PPY: pamelalt@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, PPY=rp00585en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros213230en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros226612-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. S3-
dc.identifier.spage265-
dc.identifier.epage265-

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