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postgraduate thesis: Functional lanthanide-based nanoprobes for biomedical imaging applications

TitleFunctional lanthanide-based nanoprobes for biomedical imaging applications
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Jin, J. [金介夫]. (2012). Functional lanthanide-based nanoprobes for biomedical imaging applications. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4775257
AbstractLanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are perceived as promising novel near-infrared (NIR) bioimaging agents characterised by high contrast and high penetration depth. However, the interactions between charged UCNPs and mammalian cells have not been thoroughly studied and the corresponding intracellular uptake pathways remain unclear. Herein, my research work involved the use of hydrothermal method and ligand exchange approach to prepare UCNP-PVP, UCNP-PEI, and UCNP-PAA. These polymer-coated UCNPs demonstrated good water dispersibility, the similar size distribution as well as similar upconversion luminescence efficiency. However, the positively charged UCNP-PEI evinced greatly enhanced cellular uptake in comparison with its neutral or negative counterparts, as revealed by cellular uptake studies. Meanwhile, it was discovered that cationic UCNP-PEI could be effectively internalized mainly through the clathrin endocytic machanism. This study is the first report on the endocytic mechanism of positively charged lanthanide-doped UCNPs. Furthermore, it allows us to control the UCNP-cell interactions by tuning surface properties. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of primary brain tumors in humans. Small molecule MRI contrast agents are used for GBM diagnosis and preoperative tumor margin delineation. However, the conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents have several disadvantages, such as a relatively low T1 relaxivity, short circulation half lives and the absence of tumor targeting efficiency. Multimodality imaging probes provide a better solution to clearly delineate the localization of glioblastoma. My research work also involved the development of multimodal nanoprobes for targeted glioblastoma imaging. Two targeted paramagnetic/fluorescence nanoprobes were designed and synthesized, UCNP-Gd-RGD and AuNP-Dy680-Gd-RGD. UCNP-Gd-RGD was prepared through PEGylation, Gd3+DOTA conjugation and RGD labeling of PEI-coated UCNP-based nanoprobe core (UCNP-NH2). It adopted the cubic NaYF4 phase, had an average size of 36 nm by TEM, and possessed a relatively intense upconversion luminescence of Er3+ and Tm3+. It also exhibited improved colloidal stability and reduced cytotoxicity compared with UCNP-NH2, and a higher T1 relaxivity than Gd3+DOTA. AuNP-Dy680-Gd-RGD was synthesized through bioconjugation of amine-modified AuNP-based nanoprobe core (AuNPPEG- NH2) by a NIR dye (Dy680), Gd3+DOTA and RGD peptide. It demonstrated a size of 3–6 nm by TEM, relatively strong NIR fluorescence centered at 708 nm, longterm physiological stability, and an enhanced T1 relaxivity compared with Gd3+DOTA. Targeting abilities of both UCNP-Gd-RGD and AuNP-Dy680-Gd-RGD towards overexpressed integrin αvβ3 receptors on U87MG cell surface was confirmed by their enhanced cellular uptake visualized by confocal microscopy imaging and quantified by ICP-MS, where their corresponding control nanoprobes were used for comparison. Furthermore, targeted imaging capabilities of UCNP-Gd-RGD and AuNP-Dy680-Gd- RGD towards subcutaneous U87MG tumors were verified by in vivo and ex vivo upconversion fluorescence imaging studies and by in vivo and ex vivo NIR fluorescence imaging and in vivo MR imaging studies, respectively. These two synthesized targeted nanoprobes, with surface-bounded cyclic RGD peptide and numerous T1 contrast enhancing molecules, are applicable in targeted MR imaging glioblastoma and delineating the tumor boundary. In addition, UCNP-Gd-RGD favors the upconversion luminescence with NIR-to-visible nature, while AuNPDy680- Gd-RGD possesses NIR-to-NIR fluorescence, and both lead to their potential applications in fluorescence-guided surgical resection of gliomas.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectLanthanum.
Nanotechnology.
Imaging systems in medicine.
Dept/ProgramChemistry
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181017

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJin, Jiefu.-
dc.contributor.author金介夫.-
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-17T02:42:14Z-
dc.date.available2013-02-17T02:42:14Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationJin, J. [金介夫]. (2012). Functional lanthanide-based nanoprobes for biomedical imaging applications. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4775257-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/181017-
dc.description.abstractLanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) are perceived as promising novel near-infrared (NIR) bioimaging agents characterised by high contrast and high penetration depth. However, the interactions between charged UCNPs and mammalian cells have not been thoroughly studied and the corresponding intracellular uptake pathways remain unclear. Herein, my research work involved the use of hydrothermal method and ligand exchange approach to prepare UCNP-PVP, UCNP-PEI, and UCNP-PAA. These polymer-coated UCNPs demonstrated good water dispersibility, the similar size distribution as well as similar upconversion luminescence efficiency. However, the positively charged UCNP-PEI evinced greatly enhanced cellular uptake in comparison with its neutral or negative counterparts, as revealed by cellular uptake studies. Meanwhile, it was discovered that cationic UCNP-PEI could be effectively internalized mainly through the clathrin endocytic machanism. This study is the first report on the endocytic mechanism of positively charged lanthanide-doped UCNPs. Furthermore, it allows us to control the UCNP-cell interactions by tuning surface properties. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of primary brain tumors in humans. Small molecule MRI contrast agents are used for GBM diagnosis and preoperative tumor margin delineation. However, the conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents have several disadvantages, such as a relatively low T1 relaxivity, short circulation half lives and the absence of tumor targeting efficiency. Multimodality imaging probes provide a better solution to clearly delineate the localization of glioblastoma. My research work also involved the development of multimodal nanoprobes for targeted glioblastoma imaging. Two targeted paramagnetic/fluorescence nanoprobes were designed and synthesized, UCNP-Gd-RGD and AuNP-Dy680-Gd-RGD. UCNP-Gd-RGD was prepared through PEGylation, Gd3+DOTA conjugation and RGD labeling of PEI-coated UCNP-based nanoprobe core (UCNP-NH2). It adopted the cubic NaYF4 phase, had an average size of 36 nm by TEM, and possessed a relatively intense upconversion luminescence of Er3+ and Tm3+. It also exhibited improved colloidal stability and reduced cytotoxicity compared with UCNP-NH2, and a higher T1 relaxivity than Gd3+DOTA. AuNP-Dy680-Gd-RGD was synthesized through bioconjugation of amine-modified AuNP-based nanoprobe core (AuNPPEG- NH2) by a NIR dye (Dy680), Gd3+DOTA and RGD peptide. It demonstrated a size of 3–6 nm by TEM, relatively strong NIR fluorescence centered at 708 nm, longterm physiological stability, and an enhanced T1 relaxivity compared with Gd3+DOTA. Targeting abilities of both UCNP-Gd-RGD and AuNP-Dy680-Gd-RGD towards overexpressed integrin αvβ3 receptors on U87MG cell surface was confirmed by their enhanced cellular uptake visualized by confocal microscopy imaging and quantified by ICP-MS, where their corresponding control nanoprobes were used for comparison. Furthermore, targeted imaging capabilities of UCNP-Gd-RGD and AuNP-Dy680-Gd- RGD towards subcutaneous U87MG tumors were verified by in vivo and ex vivo upconversion fluorescence imaging studies and by in vivo and ex vivo NIR fluorescence imaging and in vivo MR imaging studies, respectively. These two synthesized targeted nanoprobes, with surface-bounded cyclic RGD peptide and numerous T1 contrast enhancing molecules, are applicable in targeted MR imaging glioblastoma and delineating the tumor boundary. In addition, UCNP-Gd-RGD favors the upconversion luminescence with NIR-to-visible nature, while AuNPDy680- Gd-RGD possesses NIR-to-NIR fluorescence, and both lead to their potential applications in fluorescence-guided surgical resection of gliomas.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47752579-
dc.subject.lcshLanthanum.-
dc.subject.lcshNanotechnology.-
dc.subject.lcshImaging systems in medicine.-
dc.titleFunctional lanthanide-based nanoprobes for biomedical imaging applications-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4775257-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineChemistry-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4775257-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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