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Article: People Power As Exception: Three Controversies Of Privatisation In Post-handover Hong Kong

TitlePeople Power As Exception: Three Controversies Of Privatisation In Post-handover Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsPrivatization
Property
Neo-liberalism
Activism
Public goods
Post-handover Hong Kong
Issue Date2010
PublisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/
Citation
Urban Studies, 2010, v. 47 n. 8, p. 1773-1792 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper examines three controversies that revolve around the Hong Kong government's efforts to privatise components of its property assets in the years following the Asian financial crisis in 1997. While the rolling back of welfare and privatisation of public goods are typical features of the 'neo-liberal turn', the consequences of and responses to these processes are highly contingent upon specific historical experience and social practices. By examining the narratives of different actors over the course of these controversies, this paper aims to elucidate the contradictions and mutual entanglements between the ideology of neo-liberalism and everyday discourse and how the contestation in each of the three cases worked to reshape and ultimately to preserve the existing regime of legitimation. It also illustrates how the long-running 'laissez-faire' principles of Hong Kong's colonial period have contributed to the ongoing absorption of political critique, thus exposing the limits of 'people power'. © 2010 Urban Studies Journal Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180759
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.934
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.567
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChu, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:42:42Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:42:42Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationUrban Studies, 2010, v. 47 n. 8, p. 1773-1792en_US
dc.identifier.issn0042-0980en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180759-
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines three controversies that revolve around the Hong Kong government's efforts to privatise components of its property assets in the years following the Asian financial crisis in 1997. While the rolling back of welfare and privatisation of public goods are typical features of the 'neo-liberal turn', the consequences of and responses to these processes are highly contingent upon specific historical experience and social practices. By examining the narratives of different actors over the course of these controversies, this paper aims to elucidate the contradictions and mutual entanglements between the ideology of neo-liberalism and everyday discourse and how the contestation in each of the three cases worked to reshape and ultimately to preserve the existing regime of legitimation. It also illustrates how the long-running 'laissez-faire' principles of Hong Kong's colonial period have contributed to the ongoing absorption of political critique, thus exposing the limits of 'people power'. © 2010 Urban Studies Journal Limited.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://usj.sagepub.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUrban Studiesen_US
dc.rightsUrban Studies. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd..-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPrivatization-
dc.subjectProperty-
dc.subjectNeo-liberalism-
dc.subjectActivism-
dc.subjectPublic goods-
dc.subjectPost-handover Hong Kong-
dc.titlePeople Power As Exception: Three Controversies Of Privatisation In Post-handover Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChu, C: clchu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChu, C=rp01708en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0042098009356121en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77953868701en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros245386-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77953868701&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume47en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage1773en_US
dc.identifier.epage1792en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000278976200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, C=23097360900en_US

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