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Article: The effect of ethnic origin on nuchal translucency at 10-14 weeks of gestation

TitleThe effect of ethnic origin on nuchal translucency at 10-14 weeks of gestation
Authors
KeywordsEthnic Origin
Nuchal Translucency
Ultrasound
Issue Date2002
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/2252
Citation
Prenatal Diagnosis, 2002, v. 22 n. 7, p. 576-578 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Fetal nuchal translucency (NT) increases with gestation and is affected by fetal posture and fetal gender. A recent report suggested that there might also be ethnic differences. We investigated the effect of ethnic origin on NT in an Asian population. Methods: NT was measured at 10-14 weeks. The measurements were converted into multiples of the median (MoM) for gestational day. The risk of Down syndrome was calculated by combining NT and maternal age. Cases affected by chromosomal and major structural abnormalities were excluded. NT measurements of different ethnic groups were compared. Results: Between January 1997 and October 2001, 16 981 pregnancies with known ethnic origin and normal fetal outcome were analysed. Median NT MoM (95% CI) of the Filipinos was 1.07 (1.04-1.11). This was significantly higher than that of the Chinese, 1.01 (1.01- 1.02); other Asians (Indians, Pakistanis and Nepalese), 0.96 (0.94-0.99), and Caucasians, 0.98 (0.93-1.06) (p<0.05, respectively; Mann-Whitney U-test). An NT risk cut-off of 1: 180 would classify 5% of the Chinese, 4.6% of the Caucasians, 5.6% of the Filipinos and 4.2% of the other Asians as screen-positive. There were no statistically significant differences between these screen-positive rates (p>0.05, Chi-square test). Conclusion: Although there were statistically significant differences in NT measurements between different ethnic groups, it was clinically insignificant, as reflected by similar screen-positive rates. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180661
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.043
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.450
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, YHen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, MHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, CPen_US
dc.contributor.authorSin, SYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, HSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, SFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:40:56Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:40:56Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationPrenatal Diagnosis, 2002, v. 22 n. 7, p. 576-578en_US
dc.identifier.issn0197-3851en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180661-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Fetal nuchal translucency (NT) increases with gestation and is affected by fetal posture and fetal gender. A recent report suggested that there might also be ethnic differences. We investigated the effect of ethnic origin on NT in an Asian population. Methods: NT was measured at 10-14 weeks. The measurements were converted into multiples of the median (MoM) for gestational day. The risk of Down syndrome was calculated by combining NT and maternal age. Cases affected by chromosomal and major structural abnormalities were excluded. NT measurements of different ethnic groups were compared. Results: Between January 1997 and October 2001, 16 981 pregnancies with known ethnic origin and normal fetal outcome were analysed. Median NT MoM (95% CI) of the Filipinos was 1.07 (1.04-1.11). This was significantly higher than that of the Chinese, 1.01 (1.01- 1.02); other Asians (Indians, Pakistanis and Nepalese), 0.96 (0.94-0.99), and Caucasians, 0.98 (0.93-1.06) (p<0.05, respectively; Mann-Whitney U-test). An NT risk cut-off of 1: 180 would classify 5% of the Chinese, 4.6% of the Caucasians, 5.6% of the Filipinos and 4.2% of the other Asians as screen-positive. There were no statistically significant differences between these screen-positive rates (p>0.05, Chi-square test). Conclusion: Although there were statistically significant differences in NT measurements between different ethnic groups, it was clinically insignificant, as reflected by similar screen-positive rates. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/2252en_US
dc.relation.ispartofPrenatal Diagnosisen_US
dc.subjectEthnic Originen_US
dc.subjectNuchal Translucencyen_US
dc.subjectUltrasounden_US
dc.titleThe effect of ethnic origin on nuchal translucency at 10-14 weeks of gestationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTang, MHY: mhytang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTang, MHY=rp01701en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pd.363en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035990108en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035990108&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage576en_US
dc.identifier.epage578en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, M=26028797000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, YH=7202563903en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, MHY=8943401300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, CP=7410149538en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSin, SY=7006553270en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, R=7202300287en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, HS=7402864769en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SF=7404591050en_US

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