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Article: Perinatal diagnosis of cardiac tumors

TitlePerinatal diagnosis of cardiac tumors
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0960-7692/
Citation
Ultrasound In Obstetrics And Gynecology, 2001, v. 17 n. 1, p. 17-21 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: As fetal cardiac tumors are a rare condition, we report the perinatal diagnosis and ultrasound findings of 12 cases. Methods: In 10 cases the tumors were identified prenatally by fetal echocardiography; gestational age at detection ranged from 22 to 34 weeks. In two symptomatic infants cardiac tumors were diagnosed on the first day postpartum; prenatal ultrasound evaluation at 26 and 38 weeks of gestation did not reveal a cardiac lesion. Results: Six fetuses had singular tumors, in six fetuses they were multifocal. The left ventricle was most often affected. Termination of pregnancy was chosen in three cases, one in association with trisomy 21 and tuberous sclerosis. One intrauterine and three neonatal deaths due to cardiac failure occurred. Histopathologic examination revealed cardiac rhabdomyoma in six fetuses and fibroma in one case. In the five surviving fetuses the size of the tumors spontaneously decreased postpartum. Rhabdomyomata were associated with tuberous sclerosis in four out of 11 cases. Conclusion: Cardiac tumors are detectable as early as 22 weeks of gestation. Presenting symptoms may be arrhythmia, dysfunction of the atrioventricular valves, pericardial effusion and fetal hydrops. The most common perinatal diagnosis is rhabdomyoma, which is often associated with tuberous sclerosis. Sequential examination in high risk patients should be considered as most tumors increase in size during pregnancy and may become evident in late second and third trimester of pregnancy. Postpartum, however, regression of tumor size is common.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180660
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.197
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.766
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, YHen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, MHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, HYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:40:56Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:40:56Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationUltrasound In Obstetrics And Gynecology, 2001, v. 17 n. 1, p. 17-21en_US
dc.identifier.issn0960-7692en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180660-
dc.description.abstractObjective: As fetal cardiac tumors are a rare condition, we report the perinatal diagnosis and ultrasound findings of 12 cases. Methods: In 10 cases the tumors were identified prenatally by fetal echocardiography; gestational age at detection ranged from 22 to 34 weeks. In two symptomatic infants cardiac tumors were diagnosed on the first day postpartum; prenatal ultrasound evaluation at 26 and 38 weeks of gestation did not reveal a cardiac lesion. Results: Six fetuses had singular tumors, in six fetuses they were multifocal. The left ventricle was most often affected. Termination of pregnancy was chosen in three cases, one in association with trisomy 21 and tuberous sclerosis. One intrauterine and three neonatal deaths due to cardiac failure occurred. Histopathologic examination revealed cardiac rhabdomyoma in six fetuses and fibroma in one case. In the five surviving fetuses the size of the tumors spontaneously decreased postpartum. Rhabdomyomata were associated with tuberous sclerosis in four out of 11 cases. Conclusion: Cardiac tumors are detectable as early as 22 weeks of gestation. Presenting symptoms may be arrhythmia, dysfunction of the atrioventricular valves, pericardial effusion and fetal hydrops. The most common perinatal diagnosis is rhabdomyoma, which is often associated with tuberous sclerosis. Sequential examination in high risk patients should be considered as most tumors increase in size during pregnancy and may become evident in late second and third trimester of pregnancy. Postpartum, however, regression of tumor size is common.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.wiley.com/jpages/0960-7692/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofUltrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEchocardiographyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFetal Heart - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshFibroma - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshHeart Neoplasms - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshRhabdomyoma - Ultrasonographyen_US
dc.subject.meshTuberous Sclerosis - Complicationsen_US
dc.subject.meshUltrasonography, Prenatalen_US
dc.titlePerinatal diagnosis of cardiac tumorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTang, MHY: mhytang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTang, MHY=rp01701en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1469-0705.2001.00314.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid11244650-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035068323en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035068323&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume17en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage17en_US
dc.identifier.epage21en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167377400005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, YH=7202563903en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, MHY=8943401300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, HY=36772585300en_US

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