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Article: Meal glycaemic load of normal-weight and overweight Hong Kong children

TitleMeal glycaemic load of normal-weight and overweight Hong Kong children
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcn
Citation
European Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2006, v. 60 n. 2, p. 220-227 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To describe the pattern of meal glycaemic load of children in Hong Kong and to determine whether the meal glycaemic load is associated with childhood overweight. Method: Dietary records (3-day) of 316 Hong Kong children aged 6-7 years were collected. Glycaemic load was calculated from the estimated weight (WT), carbohydrate content (%CHO) and glycaemic index (GI) of each food taken using the equation: (% CHO × GI × WT/100). The meal glycaemic load was then the sum of the glycaemic loads of all food taken in each meal. Logistic regression analyses were used to compare the average meal glycaemic load (of breakfast, lunch and dinner) and other dietary parameters between overweight children and normal-weight children. Results: Breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks provided, respectively, 17, 29, 29 and 25% of the total glycaemic load in a day. White rice (excluding congee (rice porridge) and glutinous rice) contributed almost half of the total glycaemic load. Adjusted logistic regression showed that the meal glycaemic load was not significantly associated with childhood overweight after adjusting for parental obesity, birth weight, sleeping duration, mean energy intake and paternal smoking. Conclusion: Meal glycaemic load calculated from current diet was not an independent factor associated with childhood overweight in children aged 6-7 years. Our data suggested that modifying the type of rice/staple consumed and choosing low-GI snacks could have a major influence on the total meal glycaemic load of young Hong Kong children. © 2006 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180610
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.935
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.488
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, LLen_US
dc.contributor.authorNelson, EASen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:40:27Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:40:27Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2006, v. 60 n. 2, p. 220-227en_US
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180610-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To describe the pattern of meal glycaemic load of children in Hong Kong and to determine whether the meal glycaemic load is associated with childhood overweight. Method: Dietary records (3-day) of 316 Hong Kong children aged 6-7 years were collected. Glycaemic load was calculated from the estimated weight (WT), carbohydrate content (%CHO) and glycaemic index (GI) of each food taken using the equation: (% CHO × GI × WT/100). The meal glycaemic load was then the sum of the glycaemic loads of all food taken in each meal. Logistic regression analyses were used to compare the average meal glycaemic load (of breakfast, lunch and dinner) and other dietary parameters between overweight children and normal-weight children. Results: Breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks provided, respectively, 17, 29, 29 and 25% of the total glycaemic load in a day. White rice (excluding congee (rice porridge) and glutinous rice) contributed almost half of the total glycaemic load. Adjusted logistic regression showed that the meal glycaemic load was not significantly associated with childhood overweight after adjusting for parental obesity, birth weight, sleeping duration, mean energy intake and paternal smoking. Conclusion: Meal glycaemic load calculated from current diet was not an independent factor associated with childhood overweight in children aged 6-7 years. Our data suggested that modifying the type of rice/staple consumed and choosing low-GI snacks could have a major influence on the total meal glycaemic load of young Hong Kong children. © 2006 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutritionen_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshDieten_US
dc.subject.meshDiet Recordsen_US
dc.subject.meshDiet Surveysen_US
dc.subject.meshDietary Carbohydrates - Administration & Dosage - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGlycemic Indexen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshObesity - Epidemiology - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_US
dc.titleMeal glycaemic load of normal-weight and overweight Hong Kong childrenen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHui, LL: huic@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHui, LL=rp01698en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.irfa.2005.01.001en_US
dc.identifier.pmid16278694-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645369964en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645369964&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume60en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage220en_US
dc.identifier.epage227en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, LL=12774460100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNelson, EAS=7402264387en_US

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