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Article: Age-related decline of stand biomass accumulation is primarily due to mortality and not to reduction in NPP associated with individual tree physiology, tree growth or stand structure in a Quercus-dominated forest

TitleAge-related decline of stand biomass accumulation is primarily due to mortality and not to reduction in NPP associated with individual tree physiology, tree growth or stand structure in a Quercus-dominated forest
Authors
KeywordsCarbon Sequestration
Disturbance
Ecophysiology
Growth Dominance
Hydraulic Limitation
Net Primary Productivity
Nitrogen
Photosynthesis
Respiration
Temperate Deciduous Forest
Issue Date2012
Citation
Journal Of Ecology, 2012, v. 100 n. 2, p. 428-440 How to Cite?
AbstractAge-related reductions in stand biomass accumulation are frequently observed in old-growth forests. The phenomenon may be caused by reduced production, increased mortality or both. The relative importance of production and mortality is not well studied, so the mechanisms controlling age-related decline of stand biomass accumulation remain unclear. In this study, conducted in a Quercus-dominated deciduous forest in the Northeastern USA, we examined whether age-related decline in stand above-ground biomass (AGB) accumulation could be explained by reduction of above-ground net primary production (NPP) (growth of surviving trees) that may be associated with (i) physiological constraints within individual trees or (ii) changes in stand structure, or by (iii) age-related, increasing tree mortality in stands up to 135years old. Few previous studies have tested these hypotheses simultaneously within the same forest. We did not find evidence for a reduction in individual tree growth associated with age-related physiological constraints, in terms of foliar carbon assimilation capacity, photosynthesis/respiration balance, nitrogen availability or hydraulic constraints on carbon gain. Over the period of 1937-2006, we did not observe alterations in stand structure, and the above-ground NPP of the Quercus forest was generally stable. However, we did find that the primary mechanism driving age-related decline of stand AGB accumulation was biomass loss due to the death of large, dominant trees. Our results indicate that shifts in mortality from the loss of small trees to the loss of large trees, rather than changes in above-ground NPP, drives age-related decline in stand AGB accumulation in this forest. Synthesis.We found that within the range of stand development stages analysed, the age-related decline of stand AGB accumulation in a Quercus-dominated forest was primarily due to mortality of large, dominant trees and not due to changes in above-ground NPP associated with tree physiology, individual tree growth or stand structure. This result indicates that tree demography and the influence of climate change on disturbances may need to be integrated into models to predict the change of above-ground carbon stock of some old-growth forests. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180594
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.18
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.010
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, CYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTurnbull, MHen_US
dc.contributor.authorTissue, DTen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, JDen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarson, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorSchuster, WSFen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhitehead, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorWalcroft, ASen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, KLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:40:08Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:40:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Ecology, 2012, v. 100 n. 2, p. 428-440en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0477en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180594-
dc.description.abstractAge-related reductions in stand biomass accumulation are frequently observed in old-growth forests. The phenomenon may be caused by reduced production, increased mortality or both. The relative importance of production and mortality is not well studied, so the mechanisms controlling age-related decline of stand biomass accumulation remain unclear. In this study, conducted in a Quercus-dominated deciduous forest in the Northeastern USA, we examined whether age-related decline in stand above-ground biomass (AGB) accumulation could be explained by reduction of above-ground net primary production (NPP) (growth of surviving trees) that may be associated with (i) physiological constraints within individual trees or (ii) changes in stand structure, or by (iii) age-related, increasing tree mortality in stands up to 135years old. Few previous studies have tested these hypotheses simultaneously within the same forest. We did not find evidence for a reduction in individual tree growth associated with age-related physiological constraints, in terms of foliar carbon assimilation capacity, photosynthesis/respiration balance, nitrogen availability or hydraulic constraints on carbon gain. Over the period of 1937-2006, we did not observe alterations in stand structure, and the above-ground NPP of the Quercus forest was generally stable. However, we did find that the primary mechanism driving age-related decline of stand AGB accumulation was biomass loss due to the death of large, dominant trees. Our results indicate that shifts in mortality from the loss of small trees to the loss of large trees, rather than changes in above-ground NPP, drives age-related decline in stand AGB accumulation in this forest. Synthesis.We found that within the range of stand development stages analysed, the age-related decline of stand AGB accumulation in a Quercus-dominated forest was primarily due to mortality of large, dominant trees and not due to changes in above-ground NPP associated with tree physiology, individual tree growth or stand structure. This result indicates that tree demography and the influence of climate change on disturbances may need to be integrated into models to predict the change of above-ground carbon stock of some old-growth forests. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Ecologyen_US
dc.subjectCarbon Sequestrationen_US
dc.subjectDisturbanceen_US
dc.subjectEcophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectGrowth Dominanceen_US
dc.subjectHydraulic Limitationen_US
dc.subjectNet Primary Productivityen_US
dc.subjectNitrogenen_US
dc.subjectPhotosynthesisen_US
dc.subjectRespirationen_US
dc.subjectTemperate Deciduous Foresten_US
dc.titleAge-related decline of stand biomass accumulation is primarily due to mortality and not to reduction in NPP associated with individual tree physiology, tree growth or stand structure in a Quercus-dominated foresten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, J: jinbao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, J=rp01699en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2745.2011.01933.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863131682en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84863131682&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume100en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage428en_US
dc.identifier.epage440en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300500800012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, CY=7404182304en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTurnbull, MH=7102295064en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTissue, DT=7003804972en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLewis, JD=18040581800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCarson, R=55272368400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchuster, WSF=7103341213en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWhitehead, D=35567301000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWalcroft, AS=6602711922en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, J=35272482700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGriffin, KL=7102916495en_US

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