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Article: Dendrochonological potential of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii): A case study in the Black Rock Forest, New York

TitleDendrochonological potential of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii): A case study in the Black Rock Forest, New York
Authors
KeywordsBerberis Thunbergii
Black Rock Forest
Climate
Dendrochronology
Invasive Species
Japanese Barberry
Tree Rings
Issue Date2008
Citation
Tree-Ring Research, 2008, v. 64 n. 2, p. 115-124 How to Cite?
AbstractThe deciduous forests of northeastern United States are currently experiencing an invasion of the exotic plant species Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii). This recent and rapid invasion leads to rising concern about its potential threats to native species as well as natural ecosystems, demanding a better understanding of its invasion mechanisms and potential responses to climate change. Unfortunately, few studies have been conducted to understand the influence of climate on the growth of B. thunbergii, largely because of the absence of long-term growth records. In this study we demonstrate growth rings of B. thunbergii are annually resolved and crossdatable. The first ring-width chronology of B. thunbergii was therefore developed using samples collected from the Black Rock Forest (BRF), New York. Climate-growth relationship analysis indicates the growth of B. thunbergii in the BRF is positively correlated with precipitation in prior October, current February and May-August, but is negatively correlated with current March precipitation. The growth of B. thunbergii is also negatively correlated with temperatures in prior winter (November-January) and current summer (June-July), but is positively correlated with current spring temperature (March-May). These dendrochronological results on B. thunbergii, together with further physiological studies, will improve our understanding on how the growth of this invasive species is affected by local climate dynamics, as well as the long-term invasion potential that is tied to its responses to climate change. Copyright © 2008 by The Tree-Ring Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180561
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.565
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.043
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchuster, WSFen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:39:51Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:39:51Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationTree-Ring Research, 2008, v. 64 n. 2, p. 115-124en_US
dc.identifier.issn1536-1098en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180561-
dc.description.abstractThe deciduous forests of northeastern United States are currently experiencing an invasion of the exotic plant species Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii). This recent and rapid invasion leads to rising concern about its potential threats to native species as well as natural ecosystems, demanding a better understanding of its invasion mechanisms and potential responses to climate change. Unfortunately, few studies have been conducted to understand the influence of climate on the growth of B. thunbergii, largely because of the absence of long-term growth records. In this study we demonstrate growth rings of B. thunbergii are annually resolved and crossdatable. The first ring-width chronology of B. thunbergii was therefore developed using samples collected from the Black Rock Forest (BRF), New York. Climate-growth relationship analysis indicates the growth of B. thunbergii in the BRF is positively correlated with precipitation in prior October, current February and May-August, but is negatively correlated with current March precipitation. The growth of B. thunbergii is also negatively correlated with temperatures in prior winter (November-January) and current summer (June-July), but is positively correlated with current spring temperature (March-May). These dendrochronological results on B. thunbergii, together with further physiological studies, will improve our understanding on how the growth of this invasive species is affected by local climate dynamics, as well as the long-term invasion potential that is tied to its responses to climate change. Copyright © 2008 by The Tree-Ring Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTree-Ring Researchen_US
dc.subjectBerberis Thunbergiien_US
dc.subjectBlack Rock Foresten_US
dc.subjectClimateen_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectInvasive Speciesen_US
dc.subjectJapanese Barberryen_US
dc.subjectTree Ringsen_US
dc.titleDendrochonological potential of Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii): A case study in the Black Rock Forest, New Yorken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, J: jinbao@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, J=rp01699en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-58149498797en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-58149498797&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume64en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage115en_US
dc.identifier.epage124en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, J=35272482700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, C=7404182304en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGriffin, KL=7102916495en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchuster, WSF=7103341213en_US

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