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Article: Effective prevention of adolescent substance abuse - Educational versus deterrent approaches

TitleEffective prevention of adolescent substance abuse - Educational versus deterrent approaches
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherUniversity of Alberta, Faculty of Education. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.education.ualberta.ca/educ/journals/ajer.html
Citation
Alberta Journal Of Educational Research, 2012, v. 58 n. 1, p. 122-138 How to Cite?
AbstractSubstance abuse, especially among adolescents, has long been an important issue in society. In light of the adverse impact of substance abuse, scholars, educators, and policy-makers have proposed different approaches to prevent and reduce such abuse. This paper investigates the effectiveness of the two prominent approaches-educational and deterrent-in preventing and reducing adolescent substance abuse. The educational approach (e.g., school-based prevention programming) tends to be more comprehensive and better grounded in theories than the deterrent approach (e.g., drug testing). The educational approach not only targets multiple psychosocial factors contributing to substance abuse, but it is also supported by empirical studies showing that school-based prevention programming is effective in preventing substance abuse and has long-lasting positive influences on adolescent development. Practical implications of implementing school-based prevention programming are also discussed. © 2012 The Governors of the University of Alberta.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180518
ISSN
2001 Impact Factor: 0.129
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.137
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTze, VMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, JCHen_US
dc.contributor.authorPei, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:39:22Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:39:22Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationAlberta Journal Of Educational Research, 2012, v. 58 n. 1, p. 122-138en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-4805en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180518-
dc.description.abstractSubstance abuse, especially among adolescents, has long been an important issue in society. In light of the adverse impact of substance abuse, scholars, educators, and policy-makers have proposed different approaches to prevent and reduce such abuse. This paper investigates the effectiveness of the two prominent approaches-educational and deterrent-in preventing and reducing adolescent substance abuse. The educational approach (e.g., school-based prevention programming) tends to be more comprehensive and better grounded in theories than the deterrent approach (e.g., drug testing). The educational approach not only targets multiple psychosocial factors contributing to substance abuse, but it is also supported by empirical studies showing that school-based prevention programming is effective in preventing substance abuse and has long-lasting positive influences on adolescent development. Practical implications of implementing school-based prevention programming are also discussed. © 2012 The Governors of the University of Alberta.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherUniversity of Alberta, Faculty of Education. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.education.ualberta.ca/educ/journals/ajer.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAlberta Journal of Educational Researchen_US
dc.titleEffective prevention of adolescent substance abuse - Educational versus deterrent approachesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, JCH: lchjohn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, JCH=rp01709en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867081705en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84867081705&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume58en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage122en_US
dc.identifier.epage138en_US
dc.publisher.placeCanadaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTze, VMC=36350354300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, JCH=55376647700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPei, J=55376543700en_US

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