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Article: Alcohol use and abuse among rural Zimbabwean adults: A test of a community-level intervention

TitleAlcohol use and abuse among rural Zimbabwean adults: A test of a community-level intervention
Authors
KeywordsAfrica
Alcohol Use And Abuse
Community Intervention
Panel Study
Popular Opinion Leader
Zimbabwe
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/drugalcdep
Citation
Drug And Alcohol Dependence, 2012, v. 124 n. 3, p. 333-339 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Understanding what factors contribute to alcohol abuse in resource-poor countries is important given its adverse health consequences. Past research shows that social peers influence substance abuse, suggesting that the social environment may be an effective target for reducing alcohol abuse across a population. This study investigates the determinants of alcohol use and abuse in rural Zimbabwe and tests a Community Popular Opinion Leader (CPOL) community-based intervention partly directed at reducing alcohol abuse. Methods: Tests were conducted on the impact of the CPOL intervention on alcohol use patterns across communities in rural Zimbabwe over three waves from 2003 to 2007, including community- and individual-level tests using data based on in-person interviews of adult men and women (ages 18-30; N= 5543). Data were analyzed using paired-sample t-tests, as well as logistic and ordinary least-squares regression with random effects. Results: Higher drinking (any use, more frequent use, greater quantity, and/or frequent drunkenness) was generally associated with being male, older, not married, more highly educated, of Shona ethnicity, away from home frequently, employed, having no religious affiliation, or living in areas with a higher crude death rate or lower population density. Over the study period, significant declines in alcohol use and abuse were found in intervention and control sites at relatively equal levels. Conclusions: Although no support was found for the effectiveness of the CPOL study in reducing alcohol abuse, Zimbabwe is similar to other countries in the impact of socio-demographic and cultural factors on alcohol use and abuse. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180512
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.349
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.785
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCubbins, LAen_US
dc.contributor.authorKasprzyk, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorMontano, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorJordan, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoelk, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T01:39:09Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T01:39:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationDrug And Alcohol Dependence, 2012, v. 124 n. 3, p. 333-339en_US
dc.identifier.issn0376-8716en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180512-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Understanding what factors contribute to alcohol abuse in resource-poor countries is important given its adverse health consequences. Past research shows that social peers influence substance abuse, suggesting that the social environment may be an effective target for reducing alcohol abuse across a population. This study investigates the determinants of alcohol use and abuse in rural Zimbabwe and tests a Community Popular Opinion Leader (CPOL) community-based intervention partly directed at reducing alcohol abuse. Methods: Tests were conducted on the impact of the CPOL intervention on alcohol use patterns across communities in rural Zimbabwe over three waves from 2003 to 2007, including community- and individual-level tests using data based on in-person interviews of adult men and women (ages 18-30; N= 5543). Data were analyzed using paired-sample t-tests, as well as logistic and ordinary least-squares regression with random effects. Results: Higher drinking (any use, more frequent use, greater quantity, and/or frequent drunkenness) was generally associated with being male, older, not married, more highly educated, of Shona ethnicity, away from home frequently, employed, having no religious affiliation, or living in areas with a higher crude death rate or lower population density. Over the study period, significant declines in alcohol use and abuse were found in intervention and control sites at relatively equal levels. Conclusions: Although no support was found for the effectiveness of the CPOL study in reducing alcohol abuse, Zimbabwe is similar to other countries in the impact of socio-demographic and cultural factors on alcohol use and abuse. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/drugalcdepen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDrug and Alcohol Dependenceen_US
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectAlcohol Use And Abuseen_US
dc.subjectCommunity Interventionen_US
dc.subjectPanel Studyen_US
dc.subjectPopular Opinion Leaderen_US
dc.subjectZimbabween_US
dc.titleAlcohol use and abuse among rural Zimbabwean adults: A test of a community-level interventionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailJordan, LP: jordanlp@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityJordan, LP=rp01707en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2012.02.002en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22386686-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3383920-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84864015705en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros249772-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84864015705&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume124en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage333en_US
dc.identifier.epage339en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000307324400022-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCubbins, LA=55028513800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKasprzyk, D=6701747398en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMontano, D=55029157500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJordan, LP=43261524800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoelk, G=7007105973en_US

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