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Article: Missionary Gaze: the Social Biography and Archiving of Dr. David Landsborough IV’s Photographic Collections

TitleMissionary Gaze: the Social Biography and Archiving of Dr. David Landsborough IV’s Photographic Collections
傳道者的凝視:蘭大弼醫師照片蒐藏的社會傳記與其檔案化
Authors
KeywordsPhotography - Research
Missionaries
Photographic images
Archives
Social networks
Issue Date2012
PublisherAcademia Sinica, Institute of Ethnology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sinica.edu.tw/ioe/chinese/TJA/taiwan-journal.htm
Citation
Taiwan Journal of Anthropology, 2012, v. 10 n. 2, p. 1-56 How to Cite?
臺灣人類學刊, 2012, v. 10 n. 2, p. 1-56 How to Cite?
AbstractThis research showcases the 'social biography' and significance of missionary photographs and the archives in which these images were deposited. I explore the internal and external narratives of the photograph- as-artifact, which was generated within the practice of missionary medicine from the end of the nineteenth century to the early period after the Second World War. In particular I examine the photo collection of Dr. David Landsborough IV (1914-2009, also known as ...), with reference to other visual records produced by medical missionaries and other historical accounts. Drawing upon theories of historical anthropology and engaging the collector by the method of photo elicitation, I show how photographs present researchers with a new window on missionary medicine, one alternative to those of imperial or colonial history. Landsborough's collection reveals the mixed and hybrid material culture of British and Japanese colonialisms and the local folk of Taiwan. It also shows the transformation and localization of missionaries' identities over time. By showcasing the story 'A Skin-Graft with Love,' this paper analyses the process by which a paradigm of missionary medicine was illustrated and projected through photography and other graphic forms. It also attests to the necessity of such projection in the contested medical marketplace of multiple colonial cultures. In addition, by tracing the career history of the Landsboroughs from natural historians to medical missionaries, this paper suggests that photography can be seen not only as a method of documentation, but also as a way to represent cultural and ritual life in the social networking of certain intellectual communities. Lastly, this paper discusses the problems researchers might encounter, including ethical and cultural repatriation issues, when using photographs as resources for historical enquiry.[ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] .
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180366
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.101

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWu, HYJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-21T01:41:10Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-21T01:41:10Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationTaiwan Journal of Anthropology, 2012, v. 10 n. 2, p. 1-56en_US
dc.identifier.citation臺灣人類學刊, 2012, v. 10 n. 2, p. 1-56-
dc.identifier.issn1727-1878-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180366-
dc.description.abstractThis research showcases the 'social biography' and significance of missionary photographs and the archives in which these images were deposited. I explore the internal and external narratives of the photograph- as-artifact, which was generated within the practice of missionary medicine from the end of the nineteenth century to the early period after the Second World War. In particular I examine the photo collection of Dr. David Landsborough IV (1914-2009, also known as ...), with reference to other visual records produced by medical missionaries and other historical accounts. Drawing upon theories of historical anthropology and engaging the collector by the method of photo elicitation, I show how photographs present researchers with a new window on missionary medicine, one alternative to those of imperial or colonial history. Landsborough's collection reveals the mixed and hybrid material culture of British and Japanese colonialisms and the local folk of Taiwan. It also shows the transformation and localization of missionaries' identities over time. By showcasing the story 'A Skin-Graft with Love,' this paper analyses the process by which a paradigm of missionary medicine was illustrated and projected through photography and other graphic forms. It also attests to the necessity of such projection in the contested medical marketplace of multiple colonial cultures. In addition, by tracing the career history of the Landsboroughs from natural historians to medical missionaries, this paper suggests that photography can be seen not only as a method of documentation, but also as a way to represent cultural and ritual life in the social networking of certain intellectual communities. Lastly, this paper discusses the problems researchers might encounter, including ethical and cultural repatriation issues, when using photographs as resources for historical enquiry.[ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] .-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademia Sinica, Institute of Ethnology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sinica.edu.tw/ioe/chinese/TJA/taiwan-journal.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTaiwan Journal of Anthropologyen_US
dc.relation.ispartof臺灣人類學刊-
dc.subjectPhotography - Research-
dc.subjectMissionaries-
dc.subjectPhotographic images-
dc.subjectArchives-
dc.subjectSocial networks-
dc.titleMissionary Gaze: the Social Biography and Archiving of Dr. David Landsborough IV’s Photographic Collectionsen_US
dc.title傳道者的凝視:蘭大弼醫師照片蒐藏的社會傳記與其檔案化-
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, HYJ: hyjw@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84884517746-
dc.identifier.hkuros212886en_US
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage56en_US
dc.publisher.placeTaiwan, Republic of China-

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