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Book Chapter: Health literacy regarding aging issues

TitleHealth literacy regarding aging issues
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Health literacy regarding aging issues. In Woo, J (Ed.), Aging in Hong Kong: A Comparative Perspective, p. 157-181. New York: Springer, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractRaising health literacy at the individual level contributes to ­empowerment and coping skills needed in the context of multi-morbidity and declining function. At societal level, raising health literacy ultimately facilitates the promotion of health and well-being of older people, following the Age Friendly Cities Movement initiated by the World Health Organization in 2007. A survey carried out in Hong Kong among the general population of all ages above 16 years showed that there is inadequate knowledge regarding optimizing mental and physical function; negative attitudes regarding image and work capabilities; poor awareness of services available; poor confidence in coping with chronic diseases such as dementia; poor awareness of age-friendly environments within the home and in outdoor settings; unrealistic expectations of medical technology in prolonging life in spite of the overwhelming desire to be able to participate in end-of-life decision making; and inadequate knowledge regarding legal and financial issues at the end of life. Knowledge is poorer among the older age groups, and even among professionals involved in care of the elderly, knowledge gaps did not greatly differ from the general public. The findings underscore the needs for raising health literacy among the general population, in particular the older age groups, as well as among professional healthcare staff. In response, the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust initiated the CADENZA Project, covering public education through various media channels throughout the 18 districts in Hong Kong, a training course with online and practicum components, innovative community projects, and leadership training. Topics covered include health promotion and health maintenance; health and social services; living environment; legal and financial issues; quality of life and quality of dying; ageism/age disparities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180349
ISBN
Series/Report no.International perspectives on aging; 5

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorChau, PHen_US
dc.contributor.authorMak, BSKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-21T01:39:19Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-21T01:39:19Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth literacy regarding aging issues. In Woo, J (Ed.), Aging in Hong Kong: A Comparative Perspective, p. 157-181. New York: Springer, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781441983534-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180349-
dc.description.abstractRaising health literacy at the individual level contributes to ­empowerment and coping skills needed in the context of multi-morbidity and declining function. At societal level, raising health literacy ultimately facilitates the promotion of health and well-being of older people, following the Age Friendly Cities Movement initiated by the World Health Organization in 2007. A survey carried out in Hong Kong among the general population of all ages above 16 years showed that there is inadequate knowledge regarding optimizing mental and physical function; negative attitudes regarding image and work capabilities; poor awareness of services available; poor confidence in coping with chronic diseases such as dementia; poor awareness of age-friendly environments within the home and in outdoor settings; unrealistic expectations of medical technology in prolonging life in spite of the overwhelming desire to be able to participate in end-of-life decision making; and inadequate knowledge regarding legal and financial issues at the end of life. Knowledge is poorer among the older age groups, and even among professionals involved in care of the elderly, knowledge gaps did not greatly differ from the general public. The findings underscore the needs for raising health literacy among the general population, in particular the older age groups, as well as among professional healthcare staff. In response, the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust initiated the CADENZA Project, covering public education through various media channels throughout the 18 districts in Hong Kong, a training course with online and practicum components, innovative community projects, and leadership training. Topics covered include health promotion and health maintenance; health and social services; living environment; legal and financial issues; quality of life and quality of dying; ageism/age disparities.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofAging in Hong Kong: A Comparative Perspectiveen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational perspectives on aging; 5-
dc.titleHealth literacy regarding aging issuesen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailWoo, J: jeanwoo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChau, PH: phpchau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailMak, BSK: benise@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChau, PH=rp00574en_US
dc.identifier.authorityMak, BSK=rp00602en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4419-8354-1_7-
dc.identifier.hkuros212870en_US
dc.identifier.spage157en_US
dc.identifier.epage181en_US
dc.publisher.placeNew York-

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