File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Book Chapter: Hong Kong and other world cities

TitleHong Kong and other world cities
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Hong Kong and other world cities. In Woo, J (Ed.) , Aging in Hong Kong: A Comparative Perspective, p. 5-30. New York: Springer, 2013 How to Cite?
AbstractWith population aging and increasing urbanization, it is important to examine the quality of life of older people living in cities, in particular world cities. However, few comparative studies of world cities examine their health, long-term care systems, or the characteristics of their older populations. To assess how well world cities are addressing the challenges associated with aging populations, it is helpful to review comparable data on the economic and health status of older persons, as well as the availability and use of health, social, and long-term care services. By extending the work of the “CADENZA: A Jockey Club Initiative for Seniors” Project and the World Cities Project, this chapter compares three world cities—Hong Kong, New York City, and London. The three world cities are similar in the size and proportion of their older populations, but the characteristics of older people and the health and long-term care systems available to them differ in significant ways. These comparisons reveal how Hong Kong, New York City, and London are responding to a rapidly aging population. They should be valuable to other cities that face the challenges of population aging.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180347
ISBN
Series/Report no.International perspectives on aging; 5

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, PHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorGusmano, MKen_US
dc.contributor.authorRodwin, VGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-21T01:39:18Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-21T01:39:18Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong and other world cities. In Woo, J (Ed.) , Aging in Hong Kong: A Comparative Perspective, p. 5-30. New York: Springer, 2013en_US
dc.identifier.isbn9781441983534-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180347-
dc.description.abstractWith population aging and increasing urbanization, it is important to examine the quality of life of older people living in cities, in particular world cities. However, few comparative studies of world cities examine their health, long-term care systems, or the characteristics of their older populations. To assess how well world cities are addressing the challenges associated with aging populations, it is helpful to review comparable data on the economic and health status of older persons, as well as the availability and use of health, social, and long-term care services. By extending the work of the “CADENZA: A Jockey Club Initiative for Seniors” Project and the World Cities Project, this chapter compares three world cities—Hong Kong, New York City, and London. The three world cities are similar in the size and proportion of their older populations, but the characteristics of older people and the health and long-term care systems available to them differ in significant ways. These comparisons reveal how Hong Kong, New York City, and London are responding to a rapidly aging population. They should be valuable to other cities that face the challenges of population aging.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.relation.ispartofAging in Hong Kong: A Comparative Perspectiveen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesInternational perspectives on aging; 5-
dc.titleHong Kong and other world citiesen_US
dc.typeBook_Chapteren_US
dc.identifier.emailChau, PH: phpchau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWoo, J: jeanwoo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChau, PH=rp00574en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-1-4419-8354-1_2-
dc.identifier.hkuros212867en_US
dc.identifier.spage5en_US
dc.identifier.epage30en_US
dc.publisher.placeNew York-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats