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Conference Paper: Enhancing secondary school students’ science concepts using dental examples

TitleEnhancing secondary school students’ science concepts using dental examples
Authors
KeywordsBehavioral science
Biofilm
Cross-professional
Health services research and Learning
Issue Date2012
PublisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925
Citation
The Annual Meeting of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Southeast Asian Division, Hong Kong, China, 3-4 November 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91 n. Special Issue C: abstract no. 169674 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: Science is a major subject in school curriculum and dental examples can be attractive teaching materials for enriching student learning. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ‘dental examples' in the learning of science among secondary school students. Methods: Workshops were arranged for 102 secondary school students and 10 teachers in a dental teaching hospital. Prior to the workshop, the participants were asked some multiple choice questions related to bacteria, biofilm, pH, and common oral diseases (tooth decay and gum disease) to assess their knowledge. Then, they were provided a short lecture on the concepts of bacteria, biofilm and infectious disease followed by hands-on practical related to the aforementioned topics. Following the workshop, participants' feedback was collected. Results: The participants' knowledge before the workshop was fair as 35-77% of them knew the pH of different common drinks. Most of the students answered that bacteria are always present in the mouth (81%) and that biofilm is a structured collection of bacteria (60%). The participants unanimously rated all elements of the workshop (mini-lecture, hands-on practical, and teaching materials) as satisfactory, with over 95% of the ratings being “very good” and “excellent”. Almost all (over 96%) participants agreed that the workshop was fun, had evoked students' interest in science and had enhanced their understanding of science concepts. Over 92% of the teachers regarded what they had learnt from the workshop as useful and practical, and intended to use the dental examples and materials in teaching science at their schools. Participants' comments included: the workshop was “well designed” and “very innovative and interesting”, and had provided them “an enriched learning experience”. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the potential role dental professionals can play in enriching secondary school science learning and may evoke future efforts in knowledge exchange with the communities.
DescriptionSession: Behavioral, Epidemiologic and Health Services Research
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180205
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.602
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.714

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSeneviratne, CJen_US
dc.contributor.authorGao, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorJin, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorSamaranayake, LPen_US
dc.contributor.authorBridges, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, ECMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-21T01:33:26Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-21T01:33:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Annual Meeting of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) Southeast Asian Division, Hong Kong, China, 3-4 November 2012. In Journal of Dental Research, 2012, v. 91 n. Special Issue C: abstract no. 169674en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-0345-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180205-
dc.descriptionSession: Behavioral, Epidemiologic and Health Services Research-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Science is a major subject in school curriculum and dental examples can be attractive teaching materials for enriching student learning. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ‘dental examples' in the learning of science among secondary school students. Methods: Workshops were arranged for 102 secondary school students and 10 teachers in a dental teaching hospital. Prior to the workshop, the participants were asked some multiple choice questions related to bacteria, biofilm, pH, and common oral diseases (tooth decay and gum disease) to assess their knowledge. Then, they were provided a short lecture on the concepts of bacteria, biofilm and infectious disease followed by hands-on practical related to the aforementioned topics. Following the workshop, participants' feedback was collected. Results: The participants' knowledge before the workshop was fair as 35-77% of them knew the pH of different common drinks. Most of the students answered that bacteria are always present in the mouth (81%) and that biofilm is a structured collection of bacteria (60%). The participants unanimously rated all elements of the workshop (mini-lecture, hands-on practical, and teaching materials) as satisfactory, with over 95% of the ratings being “very good” and “excellent”. Almost all (over 96%) participants agreed that the workshop was fun, had evoked students' interest in science and had enhanced their understanding of science concepts. Over 92% of the teachers regarded what they had learnt from the workshop as useful and practical, and intended to use the dental examples and materials in teaching science at their schools. Participants' comments included: the workshop was “well designed” and “very innovative and interesting”, and had provided them “an enriched learning experience”. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the potential role dental professionals can play in enriching secondary school science learning and may evoke future efforts in knowledge exchange with the communities.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.com/journalsProdDesc.nav?prodId=Journal201925-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dental Researchen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Dental Research. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc..-
dc.subjectBehavioral science-
dc.subjectBiofilm-
dc.subjectCross-professional-
dc.subjectHealth services research and Learning-
dc.titleEnhancing secondary school students’ science concepts using dental examplesen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailSeneviratne, CJ: jaya@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailGao, X: gaoxl@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJin, L: ljjin@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSamaranayake, LP: lakshman@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailBridges, SM: sbridges@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, ECM: hrdplcm@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySeneviratne, CJ=rp01372en_US
dc.identifier.authorityGao, X=rp01509en_US
dc.identifier.authorityJin, L=rp00028en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySamaranayake, LP=rp00023en_US
dc.identifier.authorityBridges, SM=rp00048en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ECM=rp00015en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros213034en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros213911-
dc.identifier.volume91-
dc.identifier.issueSpecial Issue C: abstract no. 169674en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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