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Article: Cytokines: how important are they in mediating sickness?

TitleCytokines: how important are they in mediating sickness?
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neubiorev
Citation
Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 2013, v. 37 n. 1, p. 1-10 How to Cite?
AbstractSickness refers to a set of coordinated physiological and behavioral changes in response to systemic inflammation. It is characterized by fever, malaise, social withdrawal, fatigue, and anorexia. While these responses collectively represent a protective mechanism against infection and injury, increasing lines of evidence indicate that over-exaggerated or persistent sickness can damage the brain, and could possibly raise the risk to developing delirium. Therefore, a clear understanding in sickness will be beneficial. It has long been believed that sickness results from increased systemic cytokines occurring during systemic inflammation. However, in recent years more and more conflicting data have suggested that development of sickness following peripheral immune challenge could be independent of cytokines. Hence, it is confusing as to whether cytokines really do act as primary mediators of sickness, or if they are secondary to alternative inducing factor(s). In this review, we will (1) introduce the relationships between systemic inflammation, cytokines, sickness, and delirium, and (2) attempt to interpret the recent controversies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180128
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.58
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.290
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPoon, DCHen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, YSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorChang, RCCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-21T01:29:12Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-21T01:29:12Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationNeuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 2013, v. 37 n. 1, p. 1-10en_US
dc.identifier.issn0149-7634-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/180128-
dc.description.abstractSickness refers to a set of coordinated physiological and behavioral changes in response to systemic inflammation. It is characterized by fever, malaise, social withdrawal, fatigue, and anorexia. While these responses collectively represent a protective mechanism against infection and injury, increasing lines of evidence indicate that over-exaggerated or persistent sickness can damage the brain, and could possibly raise the risk to developing delirium. Therefore, a clear understanding in sickness will be beneficial. It has long been believed that sickness results from increased systemic cytokines occurring during systemic inflammation. However, in recent years more and more conflicting data have suggested that development of sickness following peripheral immune challenge could be independent of cytokines. Hence, it is confusing as to whether cytokines really do act as primary mediators of sickness, or if they are secondary to alternative inducing factor(s). In this review, we will (1) introduce the relationships between systemic inflammation, cytokines, sickness, and delirium, and (2) attempt to interpret the recent controversies.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/neubiorev-
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviewsen_US
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 2013, v. 37 n. 1, p. 1-10. DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2012.11.001-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshBrain - physiology-
dc.subject.meshCytokines - physiology-
dc.subject.meshDelirium - physiopathology-
dc.subject.meshIllness Behavior - physiology-
dc.subject.meshInflammation - physiopathology-
dc.titleCytokines: how important are they in mediating sickness?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, YS: janiceys@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChiu, K: datwai@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChang, RCC: rccchang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChang, RCC=rp00470en_US
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neubiorev.2012.11.001-
dc.identifier.pmid23153795-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84875061874-
dc.identifier.hkuros212923en_US
dc.identifier.volume37en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage1en_US
dc.identifier.epage10en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000316586700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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