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postgraduate thesis: Risk factors of mild cognitive impairment in older Chinese: Guangzhou biobank cohort study

TitleRisk factors of mild cognitive impairment in older Chinese: Guangzhou biobank cohort study
Authors
Advisors
Issue Date2012
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Xu, L. [徐琳]. (2012). Risk factors of mild cognitive impairment in older Chinese : Guangzhou biobank cohort study. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852177
AbstractBackground: Prior studies regarding the risk factors of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), such as physical activity (PA) and sleep related factors in older Chinese populations are scarce, and the findings have not been consistent. Objectives: 1. To cross-sectionally and longitudinally examine the dose-response association between PA and cognitive function by Delayed Word Recall Test (DWRT) or Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE). 2. To cross-sectionally and prospectively examine the association of sleep related factors, including sleep duration, daytime napping, morning tiredness and insomnia, with cognitive function. Design: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis using both baseline and follow-up data from the GBCS. Methods Baseline data from 8,451 men and 22,067 women aged 50 years or above were used for the cross-sectional analysis. Among them, 4,214 men and 11,284 women participating in the second examination were included in the longitudinal analysis. Information on demographic, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, and personal disease history was collected. Cognitive function was assessed by MMSE and DWRT under standardized protocols. Results 1. Significant dose-response relations across quintiles of metabolic equivalent value (METs) with DWRT score in participants with or without good self-rated health were found in cross-sectional analysis (all P for trend <0.001). 2. Prospectively, compared to those who were physically active, those with moderate activity or inactivity had increased risk for MCI. Regarding daily walking time, subjects with walking of 0.5 to 1 h, or ≥1 h had significantly reduced risk of MCI by 25% and 31% respectively compared with those who walked < 0.5 h per day. Subjects with low PA level at both baseline and follow-up had a significantly higher risk of MCI than those reporting PA at both baseline and follow-up. 3. Cross-sectionally, after adjustment for a range of potential confounders, an inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration and DWRT score was found, with 7 to 8 h of habitual sleep duration showing the highest score (P-values for trend from 3 to 7 h and from 7 to ≥10 h were all ≤0.001). Subjects with daily napping, morning tiredness, or insomnia had lower DWRT score than those without (P ranged from <0.001 to 0.01). 4. Prospectively, after adjustment for multiple risk factors, compared to sleep duration of 7 hours per day, those with sleep duration of 5 hours or less had increased risk for MCI by 43%. The adjusted P value for the linear trend from sleep duration of 3 hours to 7 hours per day was 0.01. The association remained after excluding those with poor health status. No significant associations of daytime napping, morning tiredness and insomnia with MCI were found. Conclusions In summary, we found a significant dose response association between PA and cognitive function in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis. One hour of daily walking is recommended for older Chinese people to delay or prevent cognitive decline. Short or long sleep duration may also be an important predictor of mild cognitive impairment. Sleep duration of less than 6 hours per day may indicate an increase risk of cognitive impairment in older people.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectCognition disorders in old age - Risk factors - China - Guangzhou.
Dept/ProgramCommunity Medicine

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorLam, TH-
dc.contributor.advisorSchooling, CM-
dc.contributor.authorXu, Lin-
dc.contributor.author徐琳-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationXu, L. [徐琳]. (2012). Risk factors of mild cognitive impairment in older Chinese : Guangzhou biobank cohort study. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4852177-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Prior studies regarding the risk factors of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), such as physical activity (PA) and sleep related factors in older Chinese populations are scarce, and the findings have not been consistent. Objectives: 1. To cross-sectionally and longitudinally examine the dose-response association between PA and cognitive function by Delayed Word Recall Test (DWRT) or Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE). 2. To cross-sectionally and prospectively examine the association of sleep related factors, including sleep duration, daytime napping, morning tiredness and insomnia, with cognitive function. Design: Cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis using both baseline and follow-up data from the GBCS. Methods Baseline data from 8,451 men and 22,067 women aged 50 years or above were used for the cross-sectional analysis. Among them, 4,214 men and 11,284 women participating in the second examination were included in the longitudinal analysis. Information on demographic, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, and personal disease history was collected. Cognitive function was assessed by MMSE and DWRT under standardized protocols. Results 1. Significant dose-response relations across quintiles of metabolic equivalent value (METs) with DWRT score in participants with or without good self-rated health were found in cross-sectional analysis (all P for trend <0.001). 2. Prospectively, compared to those who were physically active, those with moderate activity or inactivity had increased risk for MCI. Regarding daily walking time, subjects with walking of 0.5 to 1 h, or ≥1 h had significantly reduced risk of MCI by 25% and 31% respectively compared with those who walked < 0.5 h per day. Subjects with low PA level at both baseline and follow-up had a significantly higher risk of MCI than those reporting PA at both baseline and follow-up. 3. Cross-sectionally, after adjustment for a range of potential confounders, an inverted U-shaped association between sleep duration and DWRT score was found, with 7 to 8 h of habitual sleep duration showing the highest score (P-values for trend from 3 to 7 h and from 7 to ≥10 h were all ≤0.001). Subjects with daily napping, morning tiredness, or insomnia had lower DWRT score than those without (P ranged from <0.001 to 0.01). 4. Prospectively, after adjustment for multiple risk factors, compared to sleep duration of 7 hours per day, those with sleep duration of 5 hours or less had increased risk for MCI by 43%. The adjusted P value for the linear trend from sleep duration of 3 hours to 7 hours per day was 0.01. The association remained after excluding those with poor health status. No significant associations of daytime napping, morning tiredness and insomnia with MCI were found. Conclusions In summary, we found a significant dose response association between PA and cognitive function in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis. One hour of daily walking is recommended for older Chinese people to delay or prevent cognitive decline. Short or long sleep duration may also be an important predictor of mild cognitive impairment. Sleep duration of less than 6 hours per day may indicate an increase risk of cognitive impairment in older people.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B48521772-
dc.subject.lcshCognition disorders in old age - Risk factors - China - Guangzhou.-
dc.titleRisk factors of mild cognitive impairment in older Chinese: Guangzhou biobank cohort study-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4852177-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineCommunity Medicine-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4852177-
dc.date.hkucongregation2012-

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