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Postgraduate Thesis: A review of factors influencing the uptake of annual influenza vaccination by older people and recommendation for policy
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TitleA review of factors influencing the uptake of annual influenza vaccination by older people and recommendation for policy
 
AuthorsZhang, Zheng
张峥
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
AbstractBackgrounds: Receive seasonal influenza vaccination is the most safe and effective way to prevent seasonal influenza and its complications. According to the WHO, the number of hospitalizations among older people due to influenza could be reduced by a ranged from 25% to 39% as a result of vaccination. It has also been revealed to reduce overall mortality rate of the influenza seasons by a range from 39% to 75%. Moreover, influenza vaccination protects almost 90% healthy adults against clinical disease in industrialized countries, under the precondition that the vaccine antigens and circulating viruses are well matched with each other. However, the prevalence of elderly Chinese people undertaking influenza vaccination is still sub optional, the percentage of which is 62.4%. Previous researches reveal that there are a number of reasons for non-compliance to influenza immunization, including the unfavorable side-effects, doubt to the effectiveness of the vaccine, the fear of needles, as well as unawareness of the seriousness of flu. These are all factors associated with personal willingness. Aims and objectives: The aims of this paper are to explore factors that influence vaccination rate in older people and to examine other countries’ experience to identify useful policies. The specific objectives are: 1. To identify from the published literature factors which contribute either positive or negative impacts on vaccination rates in older people. 2. To group these factors into appropriate categories. 3. To make suggestions on policies to improve vaccination rates based on the identified factors and other countries’ experience. Methods: Relevant publications were achieved through PUBMED. Search strategies as well as criteria for inclusion and exclusion had been predetermined and applied. Analysis includes both community perception factors and interpersonal factors. Results: 17 English literatures were reviewed, revealing predictors of seasonal influenza vaccination for and against, which could be grouped into four categories: Factors relate to demographic, factors relate to Health Belief Model, factors relate to social support, factors relate to advice and information being provided. Conclusion: According to this literature review, demographic factors, factors relate to Health Belief Model, social support and information being provided are revealed to be associated with the elders’ inclination to get influenza vaccination.
 
DegreeMaster of Public Health
 
SubjectInfluenza vaccines.
Older people - Health and hygiene.
 
Dept/ProgramPublic Health
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Zheng
 
dc.contributor.author张峥
 
dc.date.hkucongregation2012
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractBackgrounds: Receive seasonal influenza vaccination is the most safe and effective way to prevent seasonal influenza and its complications. According to the WHO, the number of hospitalizations among older people due to influenza could be reduced by a ranged from 25% to 39% as a result of vaccination. It has also been revealed to reduce overall mortality rate of the influenza seasons by a range from 39% to 75%. Moreover, influenza vaccination protects almost 90% healthy adults against clinical disease in industrialized countries, under the precondition that the vaccine antigens and circulating viruses are well matched with each other. However, the prevalence of elderly Chinese people undertaking influenza vaccination is still sub optional, the percentage of which is 62.4%. Previous researches reveal that there are a number of reasons for non-compliance to influenza immunization, including the unfavorable side-effects, doubt to the effectiveness of the vaccine, the fear of needles, as well as unawareness of the seriousness of flu. These are all factors associated with personal willingness. Aims and objectives: The aims of this paper are to explore factors that influence vaccination rate in older people and to examine other countries’ experience to identify useful policies. The specific objectives are: 1. To identify from the published literature factors which contribute either positive or negative impacts on vaccination rates in older people. 2. To group these factors into appropriate categories. 3. To make suggestions on policies to improve vaccination rates based on the identified factors and other countries’ experience. Methods: Relevant publications were achieved through PUBMED. Search strategies as well as criteria for inclusion and exclusion had been predetermined and applied. Analysis includes both community perception factors and interpersonal factors. Results: 17 English literatures were reviewed, revealing predictors of seasonal influenza vaccination for and against, which could be grouped into four categories: Factors relate to demographic, factors relate to Health Belief Model, factors relate to social support, factors relate to advice and information being provided. Conclusion: According to this literature review, demographic factors, factors relate to Health Belief Model, social support and information being provided are revealed to be associated with the elders’ inclination to get influenza vaccination.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health
 
dc.description.thesislevelmaster's
 
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Public Health
 
dc.identifier.hkulb4842738
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
 
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)
 
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B4842738X
 
dc.subject.lcshInfluenza vaccines.
 
dc.subject.lcshOlder people - Health and hygiene.
 
dc.titleA review of factors influencing the uptake of annual influenza vaccination by older people and recommendation for policy
 
dc.typePG_Thesis
 
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<item><contributor.author>Zhang, Zheng</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>&#24352;&#23781;</contributor.author>
<date.issued>2012</date.issued>
<description.abstract>&#65279;Backgrounds: 
Receive seasonal influenza vaccination is the most safe and effective way to prevent seasonal influenza and its complications. According to the WHO, the number of hospitalizations among older people due to influenza could be reduced by a ranged from 25% to 39% as a result of vaccination. It has also been revealed to reduce overall mortality rate of the influenza seasons by a range from 39% to 75%. Moreover, influenza vaccination protects almost 90% healthy adults against clinical disease in industrialized countries, under the precondition that the vaccine antigens and circulating viruses are well matched with each other. However, the prevalence of elderly Chinese people undertaking influenza vaccination is still sub optional, the percentage of which is 62.4%. Previous researches reveal that there are a number of reasons for non-compliance to influenza immunization, including the unfavorable side-effects, doubt to the effectiveness of the vaccine, the fear of needles, as well as unawareness of the seriousness of flu. These are all factors associated with personal willingness. 
Aims and objectives: The aims of this paper are to explore factors that influence vaccination rate in older people and to examine other countries&#8217; experience to identify useful policies. The specific objectives are: 
1. To identify from the published literature factors which contribute either positive or negative impacts on vaccination rates in older people. 
2. To group these factors into appropriate categories. 
3. To make suggestions on policies to improve vaccination rates based on the identified factors and other countries&#8217; experience. 
Methods: Relevant publications were achieved through PUBMED. Search strategies as well as criteria for inclusion and exclusion had been predetermined and applied. Analysis includes both community perception factors and interpersonal factors. 
Results: 17 English literatures were reviewed, revealing predictors of seasonal influenza vaccination for and against, which could be grouped into four categories: Factors relate to demographic, factors relate to Health Belief Model, factors relate to social support, factors relate to advice and information being provided. 
Conclusion: According to this literature review, demographic factors, factors relate to Health Belief Model, social support and information being provided are revealed to be associated with the elders&#8217; inclination to get influenza vaccination.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>The University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>HKU Theses Online (HKUTO)</relation.ispartof>
<rights>The author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.</rights>
<rights>Creative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License</rights>
<source.uri>http://hub.hku.hk/bib/B4842738X</source.uri>
<subject.lcsh>Influenza vaccines.</subject.lcsh>
<subject.lcsh>Older people - Health and hygiene.</subject.lcsh>
<title>A review of factors influencing the uptake of annual influenza vaccination by older people and recommendation for policy</title>
<type>PG_Thesis</type>
<identifier.hkul>b4842738</identifier.hkul>
<description.thesisname>Master of Public Health</description.thesisname>
<description.thesislevel>master&apos;s</description.thesislevel>
<description.thesisdiscipline>Public Health</description.thesisdiscipline>
<description.nature>published_or_final_version</description.nature>
<date.hkucongregation>2012</date.hkucongregation>
<bitstream.url>http://hub.hku.hk/bitstream/10722/179954/1/FullText.pdf</bitstream.url>
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