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postgraduate thesis: Children's aggressive and prosocial behaviours: exploring age, sex-related differences, and the role ofsocial cognitive functioning

TitleChildren's aggressive and prosocial behaviours: exploring age, sex-related differences, and the role ofsocial cognitive functioning
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lee, K. C. [李嘉怡]. (2010). Children's aggressive and prosocial behaviours : exploring age, sex-related differences, and the role of social cognitive functioning. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4765710
AbstractChildren’s social behaviours have significant implications to their adjustments. Aggressive children display emotional, behavioural, and social problems. On the other hand, prosocial children are better adjusted (for review, see Card, Stucky, Sawalani, & Little, 2008). Adopting the social cognitive approach, the present study aimed to investigate the relationships between several social-cognitive capacities related to empathy (i.e., perspective-taking, affect sharing, and emotion regulation) and social behaviours (physical aggression, relational aggression, and prosocial behaviours) in children. The results showed that perspective-taking was the most predictive factor of both prosocial and aggressive behaviours, whereas the capacity to share emotions and to modulate emotion was found to have little predictive value to both positive and negative social behaviours. In addition, the present study also investigated the sex-related and age differences of aggressive behaviours in children. Consistent with the findings of previous studies, this study found that boys enacted more physical aggression than girls. However, sex-related difference in relational aggression was not found. Besides, older children were found to use more relational aggression but the trend of decreasing physical aggression across development was not evident. Clinical implications of the present findings were discussed.
DegreeDoctor of Psychology
SubjectAggressiveness in children.
Interpersonal relations in children.
Dept/ProgramClinical Psychology

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, Ka-yee, Cavy.-
dc.contributor.author李嘉怡.-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationLee, K. C. [李嘉怡]. (2010). Children's aggressive and prosocial behaviours : exploring age, sex-related differences, and the role of social cognitive functioning. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4765710-
dc.description.abstractChildren’s social behaviours have significant implications to their adjustments. Aggressive children display emotional, behavioural, and social problems. On the other hand, prosocial children are better adjusted (for review, see Card, Stucky, Sawalani, & Little, 2008). Adopting the social cognitive approach, the present study aimed to investigate the relationships between several social-cognitive capacities related to empathy (i.e., perspective-taking, affect sharing, and emotion regulation) and social behaviours (physical aggression, relational aggression, and prosocial behaviours) in children. The results showed that perspective-taking was the most predictive factor of both prosocial and aggressive behaviours, whereas the capacity to share emotions and to modulate emotion was found to have little predictive value to both positive and negative social behaviours. In addition, the present study also investigated the sex-related and age differences of aggressive behaviours in children. Consistent with the findings of previous studies, this study found that boys enacted more physical aggression than girls. However, sex-related difference in relational aggression was not found. Besides, older children were found to use more relational aggression but the trend of decreasing physical aggression across development was not evident. Clinical implications of the present findings were discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47657108-
dc.subject.lcshAggressiveness in children.-
dc.subject.lcshInterpersonal relations in children.-
dc.titleChildren's aggressive and prosocial behaviours: exploring age, sex-related differences, and the role ofsocial cognitive functioning-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4765710-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Psychology-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineClinical Psychology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4765710-
dc.date.hkucongregation2011-

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