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Conference Paper: A cross-model study on the effect of power-laws on language evolution

TitleA cross-model study on the effect of power-laws on language evolution
Authors
KeywordsComputer simulation
Language evolution
Power-law
Social popularity
Issue Date2012
PublisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/conhome.jsp?punumber=1000284
Citation
The 2012 IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence(WCCI 2012), Brisbane, Australia, 10-15 June 2012. In Conference Proceedings, 2012, p. 3237-3244 How to Cite?
AbstractBased on three evolutionary computational models that respectively simulate lexical, categorical and syntactic evolutions, we explore the effect of power-law distributed social popularity on language origin and change. Simulation results reveal a critical scaling degree (λ ≈ 1.0) in power-law distributions that helps accelerate the diffusion of linguistic conventions and preserve high linguistic understandability in population. Other scaling degrees (λ = 0.0 or λ > 1.0), however, tend to delay such diffusion process and affect linguistic understandability. Apart from the conventionalization nature of language communications in these models, increase in population size could also contribute to select the critical scaling degree, since this scaling degree can accommodate the influence of population size on linguistic understandability and many power-laws in real-world systems have their scaling degrees around this critical value.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179874
ISBN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGong, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorShuai, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:07:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:07:14Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2012 IEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence(WCCI 2012), Brisbane, Australia, 10-15 June 2012. In Conference Proceedings, 2012, p. 3237-3244en_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4673-1509-8-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179874-
dc.description.abstractBased on three evolutionary computational models that respectively simulate lexical, categorical and syntactic evolutions, we explore the effect of power-law distributed social popularity on language origin and change. Simulation results reveal a critical scaling degree (λ ≈ 1.0) in power-law distributions that helps accelerate the diffusion of linguistic conventions and preserve high linguistic understandability in population. Other scaling degrees (λ = 0.0 or λ > 1.0), however, tend to delay such diffusion process and affect linguistic understandability. Apart from the conventionalization nature of language communications in these models, increase in population size could also contribute to select the critical scaling degree, since this scaling degree can accommodate the influence of population size on linguistic understandability and many power-laws in real-world systems have their scaling degrees around this critical value.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/conhome.jsp?punumber=1000284-
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE World Congress on Computational Intelligence, WCCI 2012-
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation, IEEE-CEC 2012-
dc.rightsCongress on Evolutionary Computation Proceedings. Copyright © IEEE.-
dc.rights©2012 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectComputer simulationen_US
dc.subjectLanguage evolutionen_US
dc.subjectPower-lawen_US
dc.subjectSocial popularityen_US
dc.titleA cross-model study on the effect of power-laws on language evolutionen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailGong, T: tgong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailShuai, L: susan.shuai@gmail.com-
dc.identifier.authorityGong, T=rp01654en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/CEC.2012.6252965en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84866867864en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros222915-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84866867864&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.spage3237-
dc.identifier.epage3244-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShuai, L=55078175800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGong, T=35177507200en_US
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 131009-

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