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Conference Paper: Emerging infectious diseases and the animal-human interface

TitleEmerging infectious diseases and the animal-human interface
Authors
Issue Date2008
Citation
Novartis Foundation Symposium, 2008, v. 290, p. 113-122 How to Cite?
AbstractMajor emerging infectious diseases of humans continue to arise from animals, a fact well illustrated by SARS and avian influenza H5N1. Changes associated with our globalized lifestyle facilitate such zoonotic transmission. In order to be better prepared to predict and prevent future emerging diseases, we need to better define the viral flora in domestic livestock and wildlife, and better understand the biological and ecological determinants that allow or limit inter-species transmission of microbes. Pandemic influenza and SARS (and related coronaviruses) are likely to prove to be productive case-studies in this regard. Confronting emerging infectious threats requires a multi-disciplinary response, spanning the sectors of human and animal health, wildlife and environment, and the combined resources of government agencies and academics. It requires specialized expertise in the relevant fields but also requires those who can bridge interdisciplinary and organizational divides. It is important that such inter-disciplinary research is nurtured and facilitated. Copyright © Novartis Foundation 2008.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179853
ISSN
2004 Impact Factor: 1.879
2011 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.267
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:06:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:06:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationNovartis Foundation Symposium, 2008, v. 290, p. 113-122en_US
dc.identifier.issn1528-2511en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179853-
dc.description.abstractMajor emerging infectious diseases of humans continue to arise from animals, a fact well illustrated by SARS and avian influenza H5N1. Changes associated with our globalized lifestyle facilitate such zoonotic transmission. In order to be better prepared to predict and prevent future emerging diseases, we need to better define the viral flora in domestic livestock and wildlife, and better understand the biological and ecological determinants that allow or limit inter-species transmission of microbes. Pandemic influenza and SARS (and related coronaviruses) are likely to prove to be productive case-studies in this regard. Confronting emerging infectious threats requires a multi-disciplinary response, spanning the sectors of human and animal health, wildlife and environment, and the combined resources of government agencies and academics. It requires specialized expertise in the relevant fields but also requires those who can bridge interdisciplinary and organizational divides. It is important that such inter-disciplinary research is nurtured and facilitated. Copyright © Novartis Foundation 2008.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNovartis Foundation Symposiumen_US
dc.titleEmerging infectious diseases and the animal-human interfaceen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-56249098333en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-56249098333&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume290en_US
dc.identifier.spage113en_US
dc.identifier.epage122en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_US

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