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Article: Characterization of avian H5N1 influenza viruses from poultry in Hong Kong

TitleCharacterization of avian H5N1 influenza viruses from poultry in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yviro
Citation
Virology, 1998, v. 252 n. 2, p. 331-342 How to Cite?
AbstractThe transmission of avian H5N1 influenza viruses to 18 humans in Hong Kong in 1997 with six deaths established that avian influenza viruses can transmit to and cause lethal infection in humans. This report characterizes the antigenic and biological properties of the H5N1 influenza viruses isolated from chickens, ducks, and geese from farms and poultry markets in Hong Kong during 1997 and compares them with those of virus isolated from the index human case. Each of the HSN1 viruses from Hong Kong poultry markets that were tested were lethal in chickens, possessed polybasic amine acids at the carboxy-terminus of HA1, and by definition were highly pathogenic in poultry. The available nonpathogenic H5 influenza viruses and the pathogenic H5N1 virus from Hong Kong were analyzed with monoclonal antibodies prepaid to A/chicken/Pennsylvania/1370/83 (H5N2). The analysis revealed limited antigenic drift in 15 years and established that monoclonal antibodies are useful reagents for identification and antigenic analysis of avian strains that may transmit to humans in the future. One of the monoclonal antibodies permitted separation of the H5N1 influenza viruses from poultry into two groups that correlated with the presence or absence of a carbohydrate at residue 158 adjacent to the receptor binding site on HA. The H5N1 viruses examined replicated in geese, pigs, rats, and mice, but to only a very limited extent in ducks. It is noteworthy that all infected geese shed virus and that the H5N1 viruses caused disease signs and death in a portion (3 of 16) of the geese, with evidence of systemic spread to the brain. The tropism for geese is unusual and may provide insight into the origin of these viruses. In mice, the H5N1 virus caused lethal pneumonia and spread systemically to the brain. Mice would thus provide an ideal model system for studying immune responses and pathogenesis. Transmission experiments in chickens revealed that the H5N1 viruses are spread by fecal-oral transmission rather than by aerosol, and that the viruses are inactivated by drying of feces at ambient temperature. However, infectivity is maintained for at least 4 days in wet feces at 25°C. There were differences in the morphology of the H5N1 viruses isolated from birds and humans. The perpetuation of H5N1 influenza viruses in the poultry markets in Hong Kong and the transmission of these viruses to humans emphasize the importance of these markets in the epidemiology of influenza. The poultry markets are of critical importance in the perpetuation and transmission of influenza viruses to other avian species and to mammals, including humans.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179779
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.2
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.805
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShortridge, KFen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, NNen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorGao, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorIto, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorKawaoka, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorKodihalli, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrauss, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorMarkwell, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorMurti, KGen_US
dc.contributor.authorNorwood, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSenne, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSims, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorTakada, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:04:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:04:32Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationVirology, 1998, v. 252 n. 2, p. 331-342en_US
dc.identifier.issn0042-6822en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179779-
dc.description.abstractThe transmission of avian H5N1 influenza viruses to 18 humans in Hong Kong in 1997 with six deaths established that avian influenza viruses can transmit to and cause lethal infection in humans. This report characterizes the antigenic and biological properties of the H5N1 influenza viruses isolated from chickens, ducks, and geese from farms and poultry markets in Hong Kong during 1997 and compares them with those of virus isolated from the index human case. Each of the HSN1 viruses from Hong Kong poultry markets that were tested were lethal in chickens, possessed polybasic amine acids at the carboxy-terminus of HA1, and by definition were highly pathogenic in poultry. The available nonpathogenic H5 influenza viruses and the pathogenic H5N1 virus from Hong Kong were analyzed with monoclonal antibodies prepaid to A/chicken/Pennsylvania/1370/83 (H5N2). The analysis revealed limited antigenic drift in 15 years and established that monoclonal antibodies are useful reagents for identification and antigenic analysis of avian strains that may transmit to humans in the future. One of the monoclonal antibodies permitted separation of the H5N1 influenza viruses from poultry into two groups that correlated with the presence or absence of a carbohydrate at residue 158 adjacent to the receptor binding site on HA. The H5N1 viruses examined replicated in geese, pigs, rats, and mice, but to only a very limited extent in ducks. It is noteworthy that all infected geese shed virus and that the H5N1 viruses caused disease signs and death in a portion (3 of 16) of the geese, with evidence of systemic spread to the brain. The tropism for geese is unusual and may provide insight into the origin of these viruses. In mice, the H5N1 virus caused lethal pneumonia and spread systemically to the brain. Mice would thus provide an ideal model system for studying immune responses and pathogenesis. Transmission experiments in chickens revealed that the H5N1 viruses are spread by fecal-oral transmission rather than by aerosol, and that the viruses are inactivated by drying of feces at ambient temperature. However, infectivity is maintained for at least 4 days in wet feces at 25°C. There were differences in the morphology of the H5N1 viruses isolated from birds and humans. The perpetuation of H5N1 influenza viruses in the poultry markets in Hong Kong and the transmission of these viruses to humans emphasize the importance of these markets in the epidemiology of influenza. The poultry markets are of critical importance in the perpetuation and transmission of influenza viruses to other avian species and to mammals, including humans.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yviroen_US
dc.relation.ispartofVirologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonalen_US
dc.subject.meshChick Embryoen_US
dc.subject.meshChickens - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDucks - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFeces - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGeese - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5n1 Subtypeen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus - Classification - Isolation & Purification - Physiology - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza In Birds - Transmission - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMiceen_US
dc.subject.meshPoultry Diseases - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshTurkeys - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshVirus Replicationen_US
dc.subject.meshZoonoses - Virologyen_US
dc.titleCharacterization of avian H5N1 influenza viruses from poultry in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1006/viro.1998.9488en_US
dc.identifier.pmid9878612-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0345471424en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0345471424&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume252en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage331en_US
dc.identifier.epage342en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000077739200006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShortridge, KF=7005677034en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, NN=35224383700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGao, P=20134006600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridIto, T=7410326060en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKawaoka, Y=26643027000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKodihalli, S=6602493935en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKrauss, S=7102769210en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMarkwell, D=6602263117en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMurti, KG=35598156500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNorwood, M=36881225800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSenne, D=7003722049en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSims, L=7004354770en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTakada, A=7202962935en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, RG=36048363100en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike465676-

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