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Article: Microbiological agents associated with childhood diarrhoea in the dry zone of Sri Lanka

TitleMicrobiological agents associated with childhood diarrhoea in the dry zone of Sri Lanka
Authors
Issue Date1990
Citation
Tropical Medicine And Parasitology, 1990, v. 41 n. 1, p. 115-120 How to Cite?
AbstractBetween March and July, 1987, faecal specimens from 371 diarrhoeal children reporting to four hospitals in the district of Kurunegala, Sri Lanka and from 121 controls with other diseases were investigated for enteric pathogens. All specimens were tested for Shigella spp, Salmonella spp and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). In addition, parasitic pathogens, heat labile enterotoxigenic Esherichia coli (ETEC LT), Campylobacter and rotavirus were sought among subsamples of the cases and controls. One or more pathogens were detected in the faecal specimens of 53.7% of the diarrhoeal children and 19.6% of the controls (P < 0.001). Rotavirus was the most frequently indentified pathogen. Cases (21.9%) were more likely to be positive for rotavirus than controls (6.5%) (p < 0.05). Among children with diarrhoea the peak prevalence or rotavirus occurred in the 6-11 months age group. Shigella spp were the second most frequently isolated pathogens and single most common cause of diarrhoea in children over two years of age. Agian, cases (16.4%) were more likely to be infected than controls (1.7%) (p < 0.001). Salmonella spp were isolated from 7.5% of diarrhoeal children and 3.3% of the controls (p > 0.10). Other pathogens had prevalence rates of less than 5%. Vomiting was associated with rotavirus diarrhoea (p < 0.001), and fever with shigellosis (p = 0.02). In view of the different transmission routes and characteristics of the most important pathogens detected in this study it appears unlikely that a single environmental intervention can solve the public health problem posed by diarrhoeal diseases in Sri Lanka.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179738
ISSN
1997 Impact Factor: 0.895
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMertens, TEen_US
dc.contributor.authorWijenayake, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorPinto, MRMen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Wijesundera, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorEriyagama, NBen_US
dc.contributor.authorKarunarathne, KGen_US
dc.contributor.authorRanaweera, LRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:04:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:04:12Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationTropical Medicine And Parasitology, 1990, v. 41 n. 1, p. 115-120en_US
dc.identifier.issn0177-2392en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179738-
dc.description.abstractBetween March and July, 1987, faecal specimens from 371 diarrhoeal children reporting to four hospitals in the district of Kurunegala, Sri Lanka and from 121 controls with other diseases were investigated for enteric pathogens. All specimens were tested for Shigella spp, Salmonella spp and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). In addition, parasitic pathogens, heat labile enterotoxigenic Esherichia coli (ETEC LT), Campylobacter and rotavirus were sought among subsamples of the cases and controls. One or more pathogens were detected in the faecal specimens of 53.7% of the diarrhoeal children and 19.6% of the controls (P < 0.001). Rotavirus was the most frequently indentified pathogen. Cases (21.9%) were more likely to be positive for rotavirus than controls (6.5%) (p < 0.05). Among children with diarrhoea the peak prevalence or rotavirus occurred in the 6-11 months age group. Shigella spp were the second most frequently isolated pathogens and single most common cause of diarrhoea in children over two years of age. Agian, cases (16.4%) were more likely to be infected than controls (1.7%) (p < 0.001). Salmonella spp were isolated from 7.5% of diarrhoeal children and 3.3% of the controls (p > 0.10). Other pathogens had prevalence rates of less than 5%. Vomiting was associated with rotavirus diarrhoea (p < 0.001), and fever with shigellosis (p = 0.02). In view of the different transmission routes and characteristics of the most important pathogens detected in this study it appears unlikely that a single environmental intervention can solve the public health problem posed by diarrhoeal diseases in Sri Lanka.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTropical Medicine and Parasitologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAcute Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshBacterial Infections - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea - Microbiology - Parasitologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea, Infantile - Microbiology - Parasitologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFeces - Microbiology - Parasitologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshIntestinal Diseases, Parasitic - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMulticenter Studies As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshRotavirus Infections - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshRural Populationen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshSri Lanka - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleMicrobiological agents associated with childhood diarrhoea in the dry zone of Sri Lankaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2187225-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025231395en_US
dc.identifier.volume41en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage115en_US
dc.identifier.epage120en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1990CY17800029-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMertens, TE=35498524800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWijenayake, R=6507547269en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPinto, MRM=7202889816en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Wijesundera, SM=6508111405en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEriyagama, NB=6507526324en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarunarathne, KG=6504332017en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRanaweera, LR=55290010400en_US

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