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Article: A study of the 3.3 and 3.4 μm emission features in proto-planetary nebulae

TitleA study of the 3.3 and 3.4 μm emission features in proto-planetary nebulae
Authors
KeywordsCircumstellar Matter
Infrared: Ism
Infrared: Stars
Ism: Lines And Bands
Planetary Nebulae: General
Stars: Agb And Post-Agb
Issue Date2007
PublisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X
Citation
The Astrophysical Journal, 2007, v. 662 n. 2, p. 1059-1066 How to Cite?
AbstractMedium-resolution spectra have been obtained of seven carbon-rich proto - planetary nebulae (PPNs) and one young planetary nebula from 3.2 to 3.8 μm, an interval containing the prominent hydrocarbon C - H stretches at 3.3 and 3.4 μm due to aromatic and aliphatic structures, respectively. The 3.3 μm feature is newly identified in IRAS 23304+6147, 22223+4327, and 06530-0213 and is confirmed in Z02229+6208. Three of the PPNs emit in the 3.4 μm feature, two of these being new identifications, IRAS 20000+3239 and 01005+7910, with two others showing possible detections. The 3.3 and 3.4 μm emission features in IRAS 22272+5435 are seen in the nebula offset from the star but not at the position of the central star, consistent with the 2003 results of Goto et al. A similar distribution is seen for the 3.3 μm feature in IRAS 22223+4327. All of the PPNs except IRAS 22272+5435 show Class A 3 μm emission features. These observations, when combined with those of the approximately equal number of other carbon-rich PPNs previously observed, demonstrate that there are large differences in the 3 μm emission bands, even for PPNs with central stars of similar spectral type, and thus that the behavior of the bands does not depend solely on spectral type. We also investigated other possible correlations to help explain these differences. These differences do not depend on the C/O value, since the Class B sources fall within the C/O range found for Class A. All of these 3.3 μm sources also show C 2 absorption and 21 μm emission features, except IRAS 01005+7910, which is the hottest source at B0. © 2007. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179707
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.909
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.266
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHrivnak, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeballe, TRen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwok, SUNen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:03:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:03:05Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Astrophysical Journal, 2007, v. 662 n. 2, p. 1059-1066en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-637Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179707-
dc.description.abstractMedium-resolution spectra have been obtained of seven carbon-rich proto - planetary nebulae (PPNs) and one young planetary nebula from 3.2 to 3.8 μm, an interval containing the prominent hydrocarbon C - H stretches at 3.3 and 3.4 μm due to aromatic and aliphatic structures, respectively. The 3.3 μm feature is newly identified in IRAS 23304+6147, 22223+4327, and 06530-0213 and is confirmed in Z02229+6208. Three of the PPNs emit in the 3.4 μm feature, two of these being new identifications, IRAS 20000+3239 and 01005+7910, with two others showing possible detections. The 3.3 and 3.4 μm emission features in IRAS 22272+5435 are seen in the nebula offset from the star but not at the position of the central star, consistent with the 2003 results of Goto et al. A similar distribution is seen for the 3.3 μm feature in IRAS 22223+4327. All of the PPNs except IRAS 22272+5435 show Class A 3 μm emission features. These observations, when combined with those of the approximately equal number of other carbon-rich PPNs previously observed, demonstrate that there are large differences in the 3 μm emission bands, even for PPNs with central stars of similar spectral type, and thus that the behavior of the bands does not depend solely on spectral type. We also investigated other possible correlations to help explain these differences. These differences do not depend on the C/O value, since the Class B sources fall within the C/O range found for Class A. All of these 3.3 μm sources also show C 2 absorption and 21 μm emission features, except IRAS 01005+7910, which is the hottest source at B0. © 2007. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637Xen_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Astrophysical Journalen_US
dc.rightsThe Astrophysical Journal. Copyright © University of Chicago Press.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCircumstellar Matteren_US
dc.subjectInfrared: Ismen_US
dc.subjectInfrared: Starsen_US
dc.subjectIsm: Lines And Bandsen_US
dc.subjectPlanetary Nebulae: Generalen_US
dc.subjectStars: Agb And Post-Agben_US
dc.titleA study of the 3.3 and 3.4 μm emission features in proto-planetary nebulaeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwok, SUN: deannote@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwok, SUN=rp00716en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/518109en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34547363629en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros133765-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34547363629&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume662en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage1059en_US
dc.identifier.epage1066en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247245800027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHrivnak, BJ=35613962100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeballe, TR=7103289480en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, SUN=22980498300en_US

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