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Article: The discovery of two new bipolar proto-planetary nebulae: IRAS 16594-4656 and IRAS 17245-3951

TitleThe discovery of two new bipolar proto-planetary nebulae: IRAS 16594-4656 and IRAS 17245-3951
Authors
KeywordsCircumstellar Matter
Planetary Nebulae: General
Stars: Agb And Post-Agb
Issue Date1999
PublisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X
Citation
The Astrophysical Journal, 1999, v. 524 n. 2 pt. 1, p. 849-856 How to Cite?
AbstractWe report the discovery of two new, bipolar proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs). Both are cool IRAS sources for which we have confirmed optical counterparts by our 10 μm observations. Ground-based visible and infrared photometry was combined with the IRAS photometry and spectroscopy to produce their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs look like those of other PPNs, in particular those of bipolar PPNs. The central stars of both objects are highly reddened and have color temperatures ∼3000-4000 K. The nebulosities are dominated by scattered light, not emission lines as in planetary nebulae. IRAS 16594-4656 appears to possess the 21 μm emission feature seen previously in a dozen carbon-rich PPNs, along with the 8 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature. Published millimeter-wave observations support the notion that it is carbon-rich, while IRAS 17245-3951 appears to be oxygen-rich. These facts confirm that these two objects are PPNs in transition between the asymptotic giant branch and planetary nebula phases. Hubble Space Telescope imaging reveals that they are indeed bipolar nebulae. IRAS 17245-3951 clearly displays two lobes separated by a dust lane; thus it is viewed nearly edge-on. Two jetlike features are seen in the southern lobe of IRAS 17245-3951, similar to the base of the searchlight beams seen in AFGL 2688. IRAS 16594-4656 appears to be a bipolar nebulae viewed at an intermediate orientation, and both the lobes and the central star can be seen. IRAS 16594-4656 therefore gives us our first clear example of the apparent morphology of a bipolar PPN viewed at an intermediate orientation. The addition of these objects to the list of bipolar PPNs confirms that such bipolar morphologies develop early in post-AGB evolution.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179652
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.909
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.266
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHrivnak, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwok, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorSu, KYLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:02:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:02:16Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Astrophysical Journal, 1999, v. 524 n. 2 pt. 1, p. 849-856en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-637Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179652-
dc.description.abstractWe report the discovery of two new, bipolar proto-planetary nebulae (PPNs). Both are cool IRAS sources for which we have confirmed optical counterparts by our 10 μm observations. Ground-based visible and infrared photometry was combined with the IRAS photometry and spectroscopy to produce their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). These SEDs look like those of other PPNs, in particular those of bipolar PPNs. The central stars of both objects are highly reddened and have color temperatures ∼3000-4000 K. The nebulosities are dominated by scattered light, not emission lines as in planetary nebulae. IRAS 16594-4656 appears to possess the 21 μm emission feature seen previously in a dozen carbon-rich PPNs, along with the 8 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature. Published millimeter-wave observations support the notion that it is carbon-rich, while IRAS 17245-3951 appears to be oxygen-rich. These facts confirm that these two objects are PPNs in transition between the asymptotic giant branch and planetary nebula phases. Hubble Space Telescope imaging reveals that they are indeed bipolar nebulae. IRAS 17245-3951 clearly displays two lobes separated by a dust lane; thus it is viewed nearly edge-on. Two jetlike features are seen in the southern lobe of IRAS 17245-3951, similar to the base of the searchlight beams seen in AFGL 2688. IRAS 16594-4656 appears to be a bipolar nebulae viewed at an intermediate orientation, and both the lobes and the central star can be seen. IRAS 16594-4656 therefore gives us our first clear example of the apparent morphology of a bipolar PPN viewed at an intermediate orientation. The addition of these objects to the list of bipolar PPNs confirms that such bipolar morphologies develop early in post-AGB evolution.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637Xen_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Astrophysical Journalen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCircumstellar Matteren_US
dc.subjectPlanetary Nebulae: Generalen_US
dc.subjectStars: Agb And Post-Agben_US
dc.titleThe discovery of two new bipolar proto-planetary nebulae: IRAS 16594-4656 and IRAS 17245-3951en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKwok, S: deannote@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKwok, S=rp00716en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/307822-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033589151en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033589151&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume524en_US
dc.identifier.issue2 pt. 1en_US
dc.identifier.spage849en_US
dc.identifier.epage856en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHrivnak, BJ=35613962100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, S=22980498300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSu, KYL=26326482200en_US

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