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Article: Genetic and morphological differentiation of the indo-west pacific intertidal barnacle chthamalus malayensis

TitleGenetic and morphological differentiation of the indo-west pacific intertidal barnacle chthamalus malayensis
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://icb.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Integrative And Comparative Biology, 2012, v. 52 n. 3, p. 388-409 How to Cite?
AbstractSynopsis Chthamalus malayensis is a common intertidal acorn barnacle widely distributed in the Indo-West Pacific. Analysis of sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I reveals four genetically differentiated clades with almost allopatric distribution in this region. The four clades exhibit morphological differences in arthropodal characters, including the number of conical spines and number of setules of the basal guard setae on the cirri. These characters are, however, highly variable within each clade; such that the absolute range of the number of conical spines and setules overlaps between clades, and therefore, these are not diagnostic characters for taxonomic identification. The geographic distribution of the four clades displays a strong relationship between surface temperatures of the sea and ocean-current realms. The Indo-Malay (IM) clade is widespread in the tropical, equatorial region, including the Indian Ocean, Malay Peninsula, and North Borneo. The South China (SC) and Taiwan (TW) clades are found in tropical to subtropical regions, with the former distributed along the coasts of southern China, Vietnam, Thailand, and the western Philippines under the influence of the South China Warm Current. The TW clade is endemic to Taiwan, while the Christmas Island (CI) clade is confined to CI. There was weak or no population subdivision observed within these clades, suggesting high gene flow within the range of the clades. The clades demonstrate clear signatures of recent demographic expansion that predated the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but they have maintained a relatively stable effective population in the past 100,000 years. The persistence of intertidal fauna through the LGM may, therefore, be a common biogeographic pattern. The lack of genetic subdivision in the IM clade across the Indian and Pacific Oceans may be attributed to recent expansion of ranges and the fact that a mutation-drift equilibrium has not been reached, or the relaxed habitat requirements of C. malayensis that facilitates high concurrent gene flow. Further studies are needed to determine between these alternative hypotheses. © The Author 2012.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179612
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.957
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.911
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTsang, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorShih, HTen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, BKKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:00:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:00:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationIntegrative And Comparative Biology, 2012, v. 52 n. 3, p. 388-409en_US
dc.identifier.issn1540-7063en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179612-
dc.description.abstractSynopsis Chthamalus malayensis is a common intertidal acorn barnacle widely distributed in the Indo-West Pacific. Analysis of sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I reveals four genetically differentiated clades with almost allopatric distribution in this region. The four clades exhibit morphological differences in arthropodal characters, including the number of conical spines and number of setules of the basal guard setae on the cirri. These characters are, however, highly variable within each clade; such that the absolute range of the number of conical spines and setules overlaps between clades, and therefore, these are not diagnostic characters for taxonomic identification. The geographic distribution of the four clades displays a strong relationship between surface temperatures of the sea and ocean-current realms. The Indo-Malay (IM) clade is widespread in the tropical, equatorial region, including the Indian Ocean, Malay Peninsula, and North Borneo. The South China (SC) and Taiwan (TW) clades are found in tropical to subtropical regions, with the former distributed along the coasts of southern China, Vietnam, Thailand, and the western Philippines under the influence of the South China Warm Current. The TW clade is endemic to Taiwan, while the Christmas Island (CI) clade is confined to CI. There was weak or no population subdivision observed within these clades, suggesting high gene flow within the range of the clades. The clades demonstrate clear signatures of recent demographic expansion that predated the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but they have maintained a relatively stable effective population in the past 100,000 years. The persistence of intertidal fauna through the LGM may, therefore, be a common biogeographic pattern. The lack of genetic subdivision in the IM clade across the Indian and Pacific Oceans may be attributed to recent expansion of ranges and the fact that a mutation-drift equilibrium has not been reached, or the relaxed habitat requirements of C. malayensis that facilitates high concurrent gene flow. Further studies are needed to determine between these alternative hypotheses. © The Author 2012.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://icb.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofIntegrative and Comparative Biologyen_US
dc.titleGenetic and morphological differentiation of the indo-west pacific intertidal barnacle chthamalus malayensisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/icb/ics044en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22523127-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867566956en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros207206-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84867566956&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume52en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage388en_US
dc.identifier.epage409en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000307832000006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, LM=55319159100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, TH=52763997000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShih, HT=7201982589en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, KH=7402453508en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, BKK=7201530640en_US

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