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Conference Paper: An inventory of riverine biodiversity in monsoonal Asia: Present status and conservation challenges

TitleAn inventory of riverine biodiversity in monsoonal Asia: Present status and conservation challenges
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherI W A Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iwapublishing.com/template.cfm?name=iwapwst
Citation
Selected Proceedings of the 4th International Riversymposium (Riversymposium 2001), Brisbane, Australia, 29-31 August 2001. In Water Science and Technology, 2002, v. 45 n. 11, p. 11-19 How to Cite?
AbstractThere are few parts of the planet where human impacts on riverine biodiversity are more apparent than in monsoonal Asia. Flow regulation, drainage-basin degradation and conversion of riverine wetlands to agriculture have been occurring for centuries, while pollution and over-harvesting have become important in recent decades. Concomitant species loss appears both ongoing and rampant. Uncertainty over rates of loss is imposed by the fact that the extremely rich biodiversity of Asian rivers has not been inventoried adequately. It is nevertheless evident that some taxa are gravely threatened. Specialist riverine birds have declined, turtles are highly endangered, and over-harvesting has severely impacted fishes - an effect that is exacerbated by pollution and flow regulation. A particular conflict that constrains biodiversity conservation is the tendency for dam construction, which damages river ecosystems, to produce tangible benefits for humans through hydropower generation and relief from floods and droughts. Resolution of such conflicts requires changes in perception: for instance, realistic economic valuations of the ecosystem goods and services provided by rivers, and promotion of flagship species as conservation icons to increase citizen awareness. Translation of awareness and knowledge to action, however, remains the essential prerequisite for societal commitment to the conservation of freshwater ecosystems.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179583
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.064
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.469
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:00:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:00:00Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationSelected Proceedings of the 4th International Riversymposium (Riversymposium 2001), Brisbane, Australia, 29-31 August 2001. In Water Science and Technology, 2002, v. 45 n. 11, p. 11-19en_US
dc.identifier.issn0273-1223en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179583-
dc.description.abstractThere are few parts of the planet where human impacts on riverine biodiversity are more apparent than in monsoonal Asia. Flow regulation, drainage-basin degradation and conversion of riverine wetlands to agriculture have been occurring for centuries, while pollution and over-harvesting have become important in recent decades. Concomitant species loss appears both ongoing and rampant. Uncertainty over rates of loss is imposed by the fact that the extremely rich biodiversity of Asian rivers has not been inventoried adequately. It is nevertheless evident that some taxa are gravely threatened. Specialist riverine birds have declined, turtles are highly endangered, and over-harvesting has severely impacted fishes - an effect that is exacerbated by pollution and flow regulation. A particular conflict that constrains biodiversity conservation is the tendency for dam construction, which damages river ecosystems, to produce tangible benefits for humans through hydropower generation and relief from floods and droughts. Resolution of such conflicts requires changes in perception: for instance, realistic economic valuations of the ecosystem goods and services provided by rivers, and promotion of flagship species as conservation icons to increase citizen awareness. Translation of awareness and knowledge to action, however, remains the essential prerequisite for societal commitment to the conservation of freshwater ecosystems.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherI W A Publishing. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.iwapublishing.com/template.cfm?name=iwapwsten_US
dc.relation.ispartofWater Science and Technologyen_US
dc.rightsWater Science and Technology. Copyright © IWA Publishing.-
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAsiaen_US
dc.subject.meshConservation Of Natural Resourcesen_US
dc.subject.meshDisastersen_US
dc.subject.meshEcosystemen_US
dc.subject.meshElectric Power Suppliesen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmenten_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoring - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshFishesen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Conditionsen_US
dc.subject.meshTurtlesen_US
dc.subject.meshWater Supplyen_US
dc.titleAn inventory of riverine biodiversity in monsoonal Asia: Present status and conservation challengesen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid12171342-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036022217en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros80755-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036022217&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage11en_US
dc.identifier.epage19en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177371700003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.description.otherSelected Proceedings of the 4th International Riversymposium (Riversymposium 2001), Brisbane, Australia, 29-31 August 2001. In Water Science and Technology, 2002, v. 45 n. 11, p. 11-19-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_US

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