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Article: Psychological emptiness in the Zhuangzǐ

TitlePsychological emptiness in the Zhuangzǐ
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09552367.asp
Citation
Asian Philosophy, 2008, v. 18 n. 2, p. 123-147 How to Cite?
AbstractThree views of psychological emptiness, or xu, can be found in the Zhuangzi. The instrumental view values xu primarily as a means of efficacious action. The moderate view assigns it intrinsic value as an element of one Zhuangist vision of the good life. The radical view also takes it to be an element of the ideal life, but in this case the form of life advocated is that of the Daoist sage, who transcends mundane human concerns to merge with nature or the Dao. The instrumental and moderate views articulate a relatively commonsensical position, on which the agent continues to pursue at least some characteristically human projects. On the radical view, by contrast, the agent ceases to exercise agency and lives a life hardly recognizable as human. The three views thus signal a tension in Zhuangist ethics, and the unattractiveness of the radical view poses a potential obstacle to the application of Daoist ideas in contemporary ethical discourse. The paper argues that there are principled grounds within Zhuangist thought for detaching the instrumental and moderate views from the radical view and rejecting the latter.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179537
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.201
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFraser, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:58:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:58:14Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationAsian Philosophy, 2008, v. 18 n. 2, p. 123-147en_US
dc.identifier.issn0955-2367en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179537-
dc.description.abstractThree views of psychological emptiness, or xu, can be found in the Zhuangzi. The instrumental view values xu primarily as a means of efficacious action. The moderate view assigns it intrinsic value as an element of one Zhuangist vision of the good life. The radical view also takes it to be an element of the ideal life, but in this case the form of life advocated is that of the Daoist sage, who transcends mundane human concerns to merge with nature or the Dao. The instrumental and moderate views articulate a relatively commonsensical position, on which the agent continues to pursue at least some characteristically human projects. On the radical view, by contrast, the agent ceases to exercise agency and lives a life hardly recognizable as human. The three views thus signal a tension in Zhuangist ethics, and the unattractiveness of the radical view poses a potential obstacle to the application of Daoist ideas in contemporary ethical discourse. The paper argues that there are principled grounds within Zhuangist thought for detaching the instrumental and moderate views from the radical view and rejecting the latter.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09552367.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAsian Philosophyen_US
dc.titlePsychological emptiness in the Zhuangzǐen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFraser, C: fraser@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFraser, C=rp01221en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09552360802218025en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-61249130089en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-61249130089&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage123en_US
dc.identifier.epage147en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000257468500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFraser, C=7401516122en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike3105291-

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