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Article: Neural systems for word meaning modulated by semantic ambiguity

TitleNeural systems for word meaning modulated by semantic ambiguity
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
Neuroimage, 2004, v. 22 n. 3, p. 1128-1133 How to Cite?
AbstractOne important issue in neuroimaging research on language is how the brain processes and represents lexical semantics. Past studies with various paradigms reveal that the left inferior prefrontal and mid-superior temporal regions play a crucial role in semantic processing. Those studies, however, typically utilize words having a precise and dominant meaning as stimuli and have not manipulated lexico-semantic ambiguity, a key feature of human language, as an experimental variable. Here, we used a word generation paradigm to examine whether neuroanatomical networks for meaning are modulated by lexical ambiguity. We found that, compared with semantically precise words, semantically ambiguous words were mediated by strong brain activations in the left dorsal-lateral frontal areas, the anterior cingulate, and the right inferior parietal lobe. Semantically precise words, instead, were associated with the left inferior prefrontal and mid-superior temporal sites. These findings indicate that semantic analysis of written words is a dynamic process involving coordination of widely distributed neural subsystems, which are weighted by semantic ambiguity. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179512
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, AHDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HLen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorFox, PTen_US
dc.contributor.authorGao, JHen_US
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:58:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:58:07Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationNeuroimage, 2004, v. 22 n. 3, p. 1128-1133en_US
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179512-
dc.description.abstractOne important issue in neuroimaging research on language is how the brain processes and represents lexical semantics. Past studies with various paradigms reveal that the left inferior prefrontal and mid-superior temporal regions play a crucial role in semantic processing. Those studies, however, typically utilize words having a precise and dominant meaning as stimuli and have not manipulated lexico-semantic ambiguity, a key feature of human language, as an experimental variable. Here, we used a word generation paradigm to examine whether neuroanatomical networks for meaning are modulated by lexical ambiguity. We found that, compared with semantically precise words, semantically ambiguous words were mediated by strong brain activations in the left dorsal-lateral frontal areas, the anterior cingulate, and the right inferior parietal lobe. Semantically precise words, instead, were associated with the left inferior prefrontal and mid-superior temporal sites. These findings indicate that semantic analysis of written words is a dynamic process involving coordination of widely distributed neural subsystems, which are weighted by semantic ambiguity. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLanguageen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMental Processes - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshReadingen_US
dc.subject.meshSemanticsen_US
dc.titleNeural systems for word meaning modulated by semantic ambiguityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2004.02.034en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15219584-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3042548551en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3042548551&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage1128en_US
dc.identifier.epage1133en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222423200010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, AHD=23766960600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, HL=7409756284en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, V=16246810500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFox, PT=7402680249en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGao, JH=7404475674en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_US

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