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Article: Neural representations of nouns and verbs in Chinese: An fMRI study

TitleNeural representations of nouns and verbs in Chinese: An fMRI study
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
Neuroimage, 2004, v. 21 n. 4, p. 1533-1541 How to Cite?
AbstractThe neural representation of nouns and verbs has been a focus of many recent neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies. These studies have in general found that in English and other Indo-European languages, verbs are represented in the frontal region (e.g., the left prefrontal cortex) while nouns in the posterior regions (the temporal-occipital regions). There is accumulating evidence, however, that the picture may have been overly simplified. In the present study, we examine the representations of nouns and verbs in Chinese, a language that has unique properties in its grammar and particularly in the structure of nouns and verbs. In an fMRI experiment, subjects viewed a list of disyllabic nouns, verbs, and class-ambiguous words and performed a lexical decision on the target. Results from the experiment indicate that nouns and verbs in Chinese activate a wide range of overlapping brain areas in distributed networks, in both the left and the right hemispheres. The results provide support for the prediction regarding the impact of linguistic typology and language-specific influences on the neural representation of grammatical categories. They are consistent with recent proposals that specific linguistic experience shapes neural systems of reading and speaking and that the language-specific properties of the Chinese grammar affect the representation, processing, and acquisition in this language. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179504
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorJin, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:58:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:58:02Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationNeuroimage, 2004, v. 21 n. 4, p. 1533-1541en_US
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179504-
dc.description.abstractThe neural representation of nouns and verbs has been a focus of many recent neuroimaging and neuropsychological studies. These studies have in general found that in English and other Indo-European languages, verbs are represented in the frontal region (e.g., the left prefrontal cortex) while nouns in the posterior regions (the temporal-occipital regions). There is accumulating evidence, however, that the picture may have been overly simplified. In the present study, we examine the representations of nouns and verbs in Chinese, a language that has unique properties in its grammar and particularly in the structure of nouns and verbs. In an fMRI experiment, subjects viewed a list of disyllabic nouns, verbs, and class-ambiguous words and performed a lexical decision on the target. Results from the experiment indicate that nouns and verbs in Chinese activate a wide range of overlapping brain areas in distributed networks, in both the left and the right hemispheres. The results provide support for the prediction regarding the impact of linguistic typology and language-specific influences on the neural representation of grammatical categories. They are consistent with recent proposals that specific linguistic experience shapes neural systems of reading and speaking and that the language-specific properties of the Chinese grammar affect the representation, processing, and acquisition in this language. © 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshCerebral Cortex - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDecision Making - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDominance, Cerebral - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisteden_US
dc.subject.meshLanguageen_US
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imagingen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshNerve Net - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshNeural Pathways - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPsycholinguisticsen_US
dc.subject.meshPsychomotor Performanceen_US
dc.subject.meshReadingen_US
dc.subject.meshSemanticsen_US
dc.titleNeural representations of nouns and verbs in Chinese: An fMRI studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2003.10.044en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15050577-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1842609708en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1842609708&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage1533en_US
dc.identifier.epage1541en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220723900031-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, P=16032736200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, Z=46961272300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_US

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