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Article: The Promise of Repentance: Prison Reform in Modern China

TitleThe Promise of Repentance: Prison Reform in Modern China
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjc.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
British Journal Of Criminology, 2002, v. 42 n. 2, p. 240-249 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article draws on a number of themes from my research on the social history of prisons in modern China (1895-1949). It shows that before the advent of a communist regime, modern penological principles were widespread and a relatively sophisticated network of prisons was built according to international standards. However, prisons were not simply a transplant from the West. Prison reform was a multifaceted process linked to existing notions of crime, punishment and repentance. It was constrained by financial difficulties and had to adjust to complex institutional, political and ideological configurations. Although the language of reform was widely shared across the globe, the discourse and practice of the prison in China was characterized by specific local ideas and conditions: in particular, the prison was viewed as a new tool to pursue a Confucian notion of an ordered and cohesive social body governed by the rule of virtue.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179483
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.643
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.373
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDikötter, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:57:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:57:54Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Criminology, 2002, v. 42 n. 2, p. 240-249en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-0955en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179483-
dc.description.abstractThis article draws on a number of themes from my research on the social history of prisons in modern China (1895-1949). It shows that before the advent of a communist regime, modern penological principles were widespread and a relatively sophisticated network of prisons was built according to international standards. However, prisons were not simply a transplant from the West. Prison reform was a multifaceted process linked to existing notions of crime, punishment and repentance. It was constrained by financial difficulties and had to adjust to complex institutional, political and ideological configurations. Although the language of reform was widely shared across the globe, the discourse and practice of the prison in China was characterized by specific local ideas and conditions: in particular, the prison was viewed as a new tool to pursue a Confucian notion of an ordered and cohesive social body governed by the rule of virtue.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjc.oxfordjournals.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Criminologyen_US
dc.titleThe Promise of Repentance: Prison Reform in Modern Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDikötter, F: dikotter@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDikötter, F=rp01187en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjc/42.2.240en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036243408en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036243408&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume42en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage240en_US
dc.identifier.epage249en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174997900002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDikötter, F=6603497325en_US

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