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Article: The imperial Japanese navy and the constructed consciousness of a South Seas destiny, 1872-1921

TitleThe imperial Japanese navy and the constructed consciousness of a South Seas destiny, 1872-1921
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASS
Citation
Modern Asian Studies, 1999, v. 33 n. 4, p. 769-796 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article examines the important role played by the Japanese navy in both the creation and propagation of the ideology of southern advance in the Meiji and Taisho periods and suggests that parochial institutional concerns significantly influenced the navy's efforts to construct the notion of Japan's South Seas destiny. Both within and outside the government bureaucracy, the navy sought to increase interest in, and expansion into the South Seas in large part to facilitate naval expansion. Furthermore, this paper will illustrate that in conjunction with the navy's ideological efforts, its leaders were also willing to use traditional military means to secure territorial holdings in the Pacific, even if such actions were in direct contradiction to the civilian government's stated policy. However dissimilar the navy's sophisticated intellectual efforts and brazen military exploits were, each was motivated by a desire to strengthen the institutional and budgetary well-being of the navy.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179477
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.405
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.332
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchencking, JCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:57:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:57:52Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationModern Asian Studies, 1999, v. 33 n. 4, p. 769-796en_US
dc.identifier.issn0026-749Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179477-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the important role played by the Japanese navy in both the creation and propagation of the ideology of southern advance in the Meiji and Taisho periods and suggests that parochial institutional concerns significantly influenced the navy's efforts to construct the notion of Japan's South Seas destiny. Both within and outside the government bureaucracy, the navy sought to increase interest in, and expansion into the South Seas in large part to facilitate naval expansion. Furthermore, this paper will illustrate that in conjunction with the navy's ideological efforts, its leaders were also willing to use traditional military means to secure territorial holdings in the Pacific, even if such actions were in direct contradiction to the civilian government's stated policy. However dissimilar the navy's sophisticated intellectual efforts and brazen military exploits were, each was motivated by a desire to strengthen the institutional and budgetary well-being of the navy.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASSen_US
dc.relation.ispartofModern Asian Studiesen_US
dc.titleThe imperial Japanese navy and the constructed consciousness of a South Seas destiny, 1872-1921en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSchencking, JC: jcharles@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySchencking, JC=rp01196en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0026749X99003649en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032696432en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032696432&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume33en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage769en_US
dc.identifier.epage796en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000083513200001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchencking, JC=14626781200en_US

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