File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A preliminary epidemiological study and discussion on traditional Chinese medicine pathogenesis of chronic fatigue syndrome in Hong Kong

TitleA preliminary epidemiological study and discussion on traditional Chinese medicine pathogenesis of chronic fatigue syndrome in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherJCIM Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jcimjournal.com
Citation
Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao = Journal Of Chinese Integrative Medicine., 2005, v. 3 n. 5, p. 359-362 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Our purpose is to conduct an epidemiological study of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and its syndrome types and symptoms of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) among adults (20-50 years old) in Hong Kong, and to discuss the TCM pathogenesis. METHODS: Design: Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Measures: Demographic data, CDC (1994) CFS diagnostic criteria, Trudie Chalder fatigue scale, and China national standard for TCM syndrome types criteria. Subjects: Twenty to fifty years old adults by convenient sampling. RESULTS: One thousand and thirteen subjects were successfully interviewed. Five hundred and eighty-five subjects (57.8%) had different levels of fatigue. Sixty-five subjects (6.4%) met CFS diagnostic criteria. In terms of TCM syndrome types, blood stasis due to qi deficiency had the highest prevalence (35.7%) among CFS. In the 54 symptoms investigated in total, the first eight symptoms in order of appearing rates were soreness of loins and weakness in knees, poor spirit, lassitude, pain, insomnia, forgetting, vessels blood stasis, vertigo and dazzle. The mostly appeared tongue figures were pale and corpulent or pale dim tongue proper, white and white greasy tongue coating, and the mostly appeared pulse figure was sunken-thin. CONCLUSION: The point prevalence of CFS among adults of 20 to 50 years old was found to be 6.4%. The most prevalent TCM syndrome type was blood stasis due to qi deficiency. The TCM pathogenesis of CFS was deficiency of origin, mainly deficiency of qi and kidney, with excess of superficiality.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179431
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYiu, YMen_US
dc.contributor.authorQiu, MYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:56:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:56:26Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationZhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao = Journal Of Chinese Integrative Medicine., 2005, v. 3 n. 5, p. 359-362en_US
dc.identifier.issn1672-1977en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179431-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Our purpose is to conduct an epidemiological study of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and its syndrome types and symptoms of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) among adults (20-50 years old) in Hong Kong, and to discuss the TCM pathogenesis. METHODS: Design: Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Measures: Demographic data, CDC (1994) CFS diagnostic criteria, Trudie Chalder fatigue scale, and China national standard for TCM syndrome types criteria. Subjects: Twenty to fifty years old adults by convenient sampling. RESULTS: One thousand and thirteen subjects were successfully interviewed. Five hundred and eighty-five subjects (57.8%) had different levels of fatigue. Sixty-five subjects (6.4%) met CFS diagnostic criteria. In terms of TCM syndrome types, blood stasis due to qi deficiency had the highest prevalence (35.7%) among CFS. In the 54 symptoms investigated in total, the first eight symptoms in order of appearing rates were soreness of loins and weakness in knees, poor spirit, lassitude, pain, insomnia, forgetting, vessels blood stasis, vertigo and dazzle. The mostly appeared tongue figures were pale and corpulent or pale dim tongue proper, white and white greasy tongue coating, and the mostly appeared pulse figure was sunken-thin. CONCLUSION: The point prevalence of CFS among adults of 20 to 50 years old was found to be 6.4%. The most prevalent TCM syndrome type was blood stasis due to qi deficiency. The TCM pathogenesis of CFS was deficiency of origin, mainly deficiency of qi and kidney, with excess of superficiality.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJCIM Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jcimjournal.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofZhong xi yi jie he xue bao = Journal of Chinese integrative medicine.en_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differentialen_US
dc.subject.meshFatigue Syndrome, Chronic - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMedicine, Chinese Traditionalen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen_US
dc.subject.meshQien_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshYang Deficiency - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleA preliminary epidemiological study and discussion on traditional Chinese medicine pathogenesis of chronic fatigue syndrome in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYiu, YM: yoyo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYiu, YM=rp00464en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid16159567-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645452957en_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage359en_US
dc.identifier.epage362en_US
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYiu, YM=22837434700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiu, MY=36839076300en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats