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Article: Transforming from economic power to soft power: Challenges for managing education for migrant workers' children and human capital in Chinese cities

TitleTransforming from economic power to soft power: Challenges for managing education for migrant workers' children and human capital in Chinese cities
Authors
KeywordsChina
Migrant Children
Issue Date2011
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02188791.asp
Citation
Asia Pacific Journal Of Education, 2011, v. 31 n. 3, p. 325-344 How to Cite?
AbstractIn July 2010, the State Council of the People's Republic of China published an Outline for National Educational Development with a strong conviction to transform China from an economic power into a country of "soft power" and "strength in human resources". In order to realize such a policy goal, the Chinese government has attempted to review its current education policies and systems to initiate reforms to promote innovation and creativity in education. One of the major reform directions is to foster more collaboration between educational institutions in Mainland China with overseas partners, including institutions from the Greater China region (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau). Despite the noble policy goals set out by the Chinese government in asserting its soft power through the transformations to be introduced to its education systems and the proposal to engage in international collaborations, many citizens in the Mainland, especially the children of migrant (peasant) workers, are currently confronted with insufficient provision of education. This article critically examines issues confronting peasant worker children's education, with particular reference to the most recent policies and strategies adopted by the governments in Mainland China to deal with the growing educational demands from migrant workers' children. This article will also discuss policy implications for the Chinese government which has failed to deliver quality education to children of peasant workers when China is seeking to become a country strong in human resources. © 2011 National Institute of Education, Singapore.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179388
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.531
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.370
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, YCen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:55:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:55:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationAsia Pacific Journal Of Education, 2011, v. 31 n. 3, p. 325-344en_US
dc.identifier.issn0218-8791en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179388-
dc.description.abstractIn July 2010, the State Council of the People's Republic of China published an Outline for National Educational Development with a strong conviction to transform China from an economic power into a country of "soft power" and "strength in human resources". In order to realize such a policy goal, the Chinese government has attempted to review its current education policies and systems to initiate reforms to promote innovation and creativity in education. One of the major reform directions is to foster more collaboration between educational institutions in Mainland China with overseas partners, including institutions from the Greater China region (Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau). Despite the noble policy goals set out by the Chinese government in asserting its soft power through the transformations to be introduced to its education systems and the proposal to engage in international collaborations, many citizens in the Mainland, especially the children of migrant (peasant) workers, are currently confronted with insufficient provision of education. This article critically examines issues confronting peasant worker children's education, with particular reference to the most recent policies and strategies adopted by the governments in Mainland China to deal with the growing educational demands from migrant workers' children. This article will also discuss policy implications for the Chinese government which has failed to deliver quality education to children of peasant workers when China is seeking to become a country strong in human resources. © 2011 National Institute of Education, Singapore.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/02188791.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAsia Pacific Journal of Educationen_US
dc.subjectChinaen_US
dc.subjectMigrant Childrenen_US
dc.titleTransforming from economic power to soft power: Challenges for managing education for migrant workers' children and human capital in Chinese citiesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMok, KH: ka-ho.mok@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, YC: ssycwong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMok, KH=rp00603en_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, YC=rp00599en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/02188791.2011.594248en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053041947en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053041947&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume31en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage325en_US
dc.identifier.epage344en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000299210000007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, KH=7103141165en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, YC=7403041666en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuo, Y=35073917100en_US

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