File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: When state centralism meets neo-liberalism: Managing university governance change in Singapore and Malaysia

TitleWhen state centralism meets neo-liberalism: Managing university governance change in Singapore and Malaysia
Authors
KeywordsManaging University Governance Change
Neo-Liberalism
Regional Hub Of Education
State Centralism
Issue Date2010
PublisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-1560
Citation
Higher Education, 2010, v. 60 n. 4, p. 419-440 How to Cite?
AbstractWith strong intention to enhance the global competitiveness of their university systems, both the Singapore and Malaysia governments have introduced reforms along the lines of ideas and practices embedded in neo-liberalism. In the last decade or so, we have witnessed reforms being introduced to the higher education sectors in these Asian states, particularly when corporatization and incorporation strategies are adopted to transform national/public universities. With particular reference to how academics evaluate the impact of the reforms on their academic life, this article reports and analyses findings generated from campus visits and field interviews conducted in Singapore and Malaysia from 2007 to 2009. Although the senior management of corporatized/incorporated universities in these Asian states has been given more discretion to decide how to operate their universities, most of the front line academics that we interviewed have not experienced major differences in university governance after the reforms took place. Instead of feeling 'emancipated' and 'empowered', many academics feel more pressures and control from the university administration and government ministries. Despite the fact that both the Singapore and Malaysia governments have tried to embrace the ideas and practices of 'neo-liberalism' to transform university governance, academics still see the state's reluctance in withdrawing from steering/controlling higher education development. Such observations clearly reflect the 'clash' of two major governance philosophies, namely, 'state centralism' and 'neo-liberalism'. In short, this article critically examines how far the proposed university governance reforms by adopting the corporatization/incorporation strategies have actually transformed university management and academic life style in Singapore and Malaysia. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179381
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.207
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.717
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, KHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:55:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:55:35Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationHigher Education, 2010, v. 60 n. 4, p. 419-440en_US
dc.identifier.issn0018-1560en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179381-
dc.description.abstractWith strong intention to enhance the global competitiveness of their university systems, both the Singapore and Malaysia governments have introduced reforms along the lines of ideas and practices embedded in neo-liberalism. In the last decade or so, we have witnessed reforms being introduced to the higher education sectors in these Asian states, particularly when corporatization and incorporation strategies are adopted to transform national/public universities. With particular reference to how academics evaluate the impact of the reforms on their academic life, this article reports and analyses findings generated from campus visits and field interviews conducted in Singapore and Malaysia from 2007 to 2009. Although the senior management of corporatized/incorporated universities in these Asian states has been given more discretion to decide how to operate their universities, most of the front line academics that we interviewed have not experienced major differences in university governance after the reforms took place. Instead of feeling 'emancipated' and 'empowered', many academics feel more pressures and control from the university administration and government ministries. Despite the fact that both the Singapore and Malaysia governments have tried to embrace the ideas and practices of 'neo-liberalism' to transform university governance, academics still see the state's reluctance in withdrawing from steering/controlling higher education development. Such observations clearly reflect the 'clash' of two major governance philosophies, namely, 'state centralism' and 'neo-liberalism'. In short, this article critically examines how far the proposed university governance reforms by adopting the corporatization/incorporation strategies have actually transformed university management and academic life style in Singapore and Malaysia. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Netherlands. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0018-1560en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHigher Educationen_US
dc.subjectManaging University Governance Changeen_US
dc.subjectNeo-Liberalismen_US
dc.subjectRegional Hub Of Educationen_US
dc.subjectState Centralismen_US
dc.titleWhen state centralism meets neo-liberalism: Managing university governance change in Singapore and Malaysiaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailMok, KH: ka-ho.mok@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMok, KH=rp00603en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10734-009-9307-9en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77956705409en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77956705409&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume60en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage419en_US
dc.identifier.epage440en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000281847200004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, KH=7103141165en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike6823192-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats