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Article: Misinterpreting the potential benefits of aggregation for reducing desiccation in the intertidal: A simple analogy

TitleMisinterpreting the potential benefits of aggregation for reducing desiccation in the intertidal: A simple analogy
Authors
KeywordsAggregation
Desiccation
Gastropod
Mollusc
Snail
Water Loss
Issue Date2012
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Verlag GmbH. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/MAE
Citation
Marine Ecology, 2012, v. 33 n. 4, p. 512-515 How to Cite?
AbstractThe potential adaptive benefits of aggregation in intertidal invertebrates, in terms of preventing desiccation stress, are logical, but have proved difficult to confirm from field measurements. Through a simple analogy we explain why this may be so, especially for those species that do not solely forage when fully immersed. Measuring water content (or osmotic potentials of body fluids) of individuals that become inactive in aggregations and comparing this with non-aggregated individuals, which is the most common method of determining adaptive benefits of aggregation to desiccation, (i) causes any relationships between desiccation and aggregation to be, at best, weakly related due to variability in the different times that individuals enter aggregations, and (ii) is not measuring the true benefit of aggregation, which in this case should be measured as a reduction in the rate of water loss. Further, the design of field studies or experiments to determine the benefits of aggregation in terms of desiccation reduction is extremely challenging, due to the unavoidable repeated disturbances to individuals that are necessary to measure water levels at multiple occasions, in order to measure the rate of water loss. We suggest that development of biomimetic sensors, such as modification of the robolimpet sensor, are required to measure in situ rates of water loss with a high temporal resolution. Although such sensors may not be truly physiologically realistic, they are likely to provide the least confounded approach to understanding benefits of aggregation in terms of physical stress reduction. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179333
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.138
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.735
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStafford, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorDavies, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:54:17Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:54:17Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology, 2012, v. 33 n. 4, p. 512-515en_US
dc.identifier.issn0173-9565en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179333-
dc.description.abstractThe potential adaptive benefits of aggregation in intertidal invertebrates, in terms of preventing desiccation stress, are logical, but have proved difficult to confirm from field measurements. Through a simple analogy we explain why this may be so, especially for those species that do not solely forage when fully immersed. Measuring water content (or osmotic potentials of body fluids) of individuals that become inactive in aggregations and comparing this with non-aggregated individuals, which is the most common method of determining adaptive benefits of aggregation to desiccation, (i) causes any relationships between desiccation and aggregation to be, at best, weakly related due to variability in the different times that individuals enter aggregations, and (ii) is not measuring the true benefit of aggregation, which in this case should be measured as a reduction in the rate of water loss. Further, the design of field studies or experiments to determine the benefits of aggregation in terms of desiccation reduction is extremely challenging, due to the unavoidable repeated disturbances to individuals that are necessary to measure water levels at multiple occasions, in order to measure the rate of water loss. We suggest that development of biomimetic sensors, such as modification of the robolimpet sensor, are required to measure in situ rates of water loss with a high temporal resolution. Although such sensors may not be truly physiologically realistic, they are likely to provide the least confounded approach to understanding benefits of aggregation in terms of physical stress reduction. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Verlag GmbH. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/MAE-
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Ecologyen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com-
dc.subjectAggregationen_US
dc.subjectDesiccationen_US
dc.subjectGastropoden_US
dc.subjectMolluscen_US
dc.subjectSnailen_US
dc.subjectWater Lossen_US
dc.titleMisinterpreting the potential benefits of aggregation for reducing desiccation in the intertidal: A simple analogyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1439-0485.2012.00513.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867982416en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros218502-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84867982416&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume33en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage512en_US
dc.identifier.epage515en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000314406300011-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStafford, R=14007374300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDavies, MS=35121268800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_US

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