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Article: Phylogeography of the cold-water barnacle Chthamalus challengeri in the north-western Pacific: Effect of past population expansion and contemporary gene flow

TitlePhylogeography of the cold-water barnacle Chthamalus challengeri in the north-western Pacific: Effect of past population expansion and contemporary gene flow
Authors
Keywords12S Rdna
16S Rdna
Chthamalus Challengeri
Cytochrome Oxidase I
Glacial Period
Its1
Marine Provinces
Phylogeography
Population Expansion
Range Shift
Rocky Shore
Issue Date2012
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JBI
Citation
Journal Of Biogeography, 2012, v. 39 n. 10, p. 1819-1835 How to Cite?
AbstractAim Phylogeographical patterns of marine organisms in the north-western Pacific are shaped by the interaction of past sea-level fluctuations during glacial maxima and present-day gene flow. This study examines whether observed population differentiation in the barnacle Chthamalus challengeri, which is endemic to the north-western Pacific, can be explained by the interactions between historical glacial events and patterns of contemporary gene flow. Location Eleven locations in the north-western Pacific. Methods Partial sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), 12S, 16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) were obtained from 312 individuals. Parsimony haplotype networks and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) were used to determine whether the observed genetic structure corresponds to marine provinces (Kuroshio Current and China Sea Coastal Provinces), zoogeographical zones (oriental and Japan warm-temperate zones) and/or potential refugial areas (Sea of Japan and East China Sea) in the north-western Pacific. Neutrality tests, mismatch distribution analysis and Bayesian skyline plots were used to infer the demographic history of C.challengeri. Results In total, 312, 117, 182 and 250 sequences were obtained for COI, 12S, 16S and ITS1, respectively. A panmictic population was revealed, which did not conform to the 'isolation by distance' model. None of the a priori population groupings based on marine provinces, zoogeographical zones or potential refugial areas was associated with observed genetic patterns. Significant negative values from neutrality tests and the unimodal mismatch distribution and expansion patterns in Bayesian skyline plots for the COI and 16S data sets indicate a population expansion in the mid-Pleistocene (c.200ka). Information from the fossil record suggests that there has been a northward range shift of this species from the East China Sea or the Palaeo-Pacific coast of Japan to the Sea of Japan since the mid-Pleistocene. Mainconclusions Chthamalus challengeri has experienced a population expansion and range shift since the mid-Pleistocene. The observed lack of population differentiation can be explained by this past population expansion and present-day wide-scale larval dispersal (owing to the long planktonic larval duration) across marine provinces, which have led to the successful establishment of the species in different zoogeographical zones and habitats. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179310
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.997
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.807
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheang, CCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTsang, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, WCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, GAen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, BKKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:54:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:54:03Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Biogeography, 2012, v. 39 n. 10, p. 1819-1835en_US
dc.identifier.issn0305-0270en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179310-
dc.description.abstractAim Phylogeographical patterns of marine organisms in the north-western Pacific are shaped by the interaction of past sea-level fluctuations during glacial maxima and present-day gene flow. This study examines whether observed population differentiation in the barnacle Chthamalus challengeri, which is endemic to the north-western Pacific, can be explained by the interactions between historical glacial events and patterns of contemporary gene flow. Location Eleven locations in the north-western Pacific. Methods Partial sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI), 12S, 16S and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) were obtained from 312 individuals. Parsimony haplotype networks and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) were used to determine whether the observed genetic structure corresponds to marine provinces (Kuroshio Current and China Sea Coastal Provinces), zoogeographical zones (oriental and Japan warm-temperate zones) and/or potential refugial areas (Sea of Japan and East China Sea) in the north-western Pacific. Neutrality tests, mismatch distribution analysis and Bayesian skyline plots were used to infer the demographic history of C.challengeri. Results In total, 312, 117, 182 and 250 sequences were obtained for COI, 12S, 16S and ITS1, respectively. A panmictic population was revealed, which did not conform to the 'isolation by distance' model. None of the a priori population groupings based on marine provinces, zoogeographical zones or potential refugial areas was associated with observed genetic patterns. Significant negative values from neutrality tests and the unimodal mismatch distribution and expansion patterns in Bayesian skyline plots for the COI and 16S data sets indicate a population expansion in the mid-Pleistocene (c.200ka). Information from the fossil record suggests that there has been a northward range shift of this species from the East China Sea or the Palaeo-Pacific coast of Japan to the Sea of Japan since the mid-Pleistocene. Mainconclusions Chthamalus challengeri has experienced a population expansion and range shift since the mid-Pleistocene. The observed lack of population differentiation can be explained by this past population expansion and present-day wide-scale larval dispersal (owing to the long planktonic larval duration) across marine provinces, which have led to the successful establishment of the species in different zoogeographical zones and habitats. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JBIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biogeographyen_US
dc.subject12S Rdnaen_US
dc.subject16S Rdnaen_US
dc.subjectChthamalus Challengerien_US
dc.subjectCytochrome Oxidase Ien_US
dc.subjectGlacial Perioden_US
dc.subjectIts1en_US
dc.subjectMarine Provincesen_US
dc.subjectPhylogeographyen_US
dc.subjectPopulation Expansionen_US
dc.subjectRange Shiften_US
dc.subjectRocky Shoreen_US
dc.titlePhylogeography of the cold-water barnacle Chthamalus challengeri in the north-western Pacific: Effect of past population expansion and contemporary gene flowen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWilliams, GA: hrsbwga@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWilliams, GA=rp00804en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2699.2012.02742.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84866322011en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros218500-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84866322011&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1819en_US
dc.identifier.epage1835en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308876600007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheang, CC=24503074800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsang, LM=55319159100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, WC=24723024100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilliams, GA=7406082821en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, KH=7402453508en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, BKK=7201530640en_US

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