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Article: Maternal green tea extract supplementation to rats fed a high-fat diet ameliorates insulin resistance in adult male offspring

TitleMaternal green tea extract supplementation to rats fed a high-fat diet ameliorates insulin resistance in adult male offspring
Authors
KeywordsDevelopmental Programming
Green Tea
High-Fat
Insulin Resistance
Offspring
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jnutbio
Citation
Journal Of Nutritional Biochemistry, 2012, v. 23 n. 12, p. 1655-1660 How to Cite?
AbstractMaternal overnutrition is associated with increased risk of metabolic disorders in the offspring. This study tested the hypothesis that maternal green tea (GT) supplementation can alleviate metabolic derangements in high-fat-diet-fed rats born of obese dams. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed low-fat (LF, 7%), high-fat (HF, 30%) or HF diet containing 0.75% or 1.0% GT extract (GT1, GT2) prior to conception and throughout gestation and lactation. Both doses of GT significantly improved metabolic parameters of HF-fed lactating dams (P<.05). Birth weight and litter size of offspring from HF dams were similar, but GT supplementation led to lighter pups on day 21 (P<.05). The weaned male pups received HF, GT1 or GT2 diet (dam/pup diet groups: LF/HF, HF/HF, HF/GT1, HF/GT2, GT1/HF and GT2/HF). At week 13, they had similar weight but insulin resistance index (IRI), serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and liver triglyceride of rats born to GT dams were 57%, 23% and 26% lower, accompanied by improved gene/protein expressions related to lipid and glucose metabolism, compared with the HF/HF rats (P<.05). Although HF/GT1 and HF/GT2 rats had lower serum NEFA, their insulin and IRI were comparable to HF/HF rats. This study shows that metabolic derangements induced by an overnourished mother could be offset by supplementing GT to the maternal diet and that this approach is more effective than giving GT to offspring since weaning. Hence, adverse effects of developmental programming are reversible, at least in part, by supplementing bioactive food component(s) to the mother's diet. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179270
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.668
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.886
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorTse, IMYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, ETSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Nutritional Biochemistry, 2012, v. 23 n. 12, p. 1655-1660en_US
dc.identifier.issn0955-2863en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179270-
dc.description.abstractMaternal overnutrition is associated with increased risk of metabolic disorders in the offspring. This study tested the hypothesis that maternal green tea (GT) supplementation can alleviate metabolic derangements in high-fat-diet-fed rats born of obese dams. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed low-fat (LF, 7%), high-fat (HF, 30%) or HF diet containing 0.75% or 1.0% GT extract (GT1, GT2) prior to conception and throughout gestation and lactation. Both doses of GT significantly improved metabolic parameters of HF-fed lactating dams (P<.05). Birth weight and litter size of offspring from HF dams were similar, but GT supplementation led to lighter pups on day 21 (P<.05). The weaned male pups received HF, GT1 or GT2 diet (dam/pup diet groups: LF/HF, HF/HF, HF/GT1, HF/GT2, GT1/HF and GT2/HF). At week 13, they had similar weight but insulin resistance index (IRI), serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and liver triglyceride of rats born to GT dams were 57%, 23% and 26% lower, accompanied by improved gene/protein expressions related to lipid and glucose metabolism, compared with the HF/HF rats (P<.05). Although HF/GT1 and HF/GT2 rats had lower serum NEFA, their insulin and IRI were comparable to HF/HF rats. This study shows that metabolic derangements induced by an overnourished mother could be offset by supplementing GT to the maternal diet and that this approach is more effective than giving GT to offspring since weaning. Hence, adverse effects of developmental programming are reversible, at least in part, by supplementing bioactive food component(s) to the mother's diet. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jnutbioen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Nutritional Biochemistryen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental Programmingen_US
dc.subjectGreen Teaen_US
dc.subjectHigh-Faten_US
dc.subjectInsulin Resistanceen_US
dc.subjectOffspringen_US
dc.titleMaternal green tea extract supplementation to rats fed a high-fat diet ameliorates insulin resistance in adult male offspringen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, ETS: etsli@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, ETS=rp00737en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jnutbio.2011.11.008en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22464150-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84869087914en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros220247-
dc.identifier.eissn1873-4847-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000311710700014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, S=55133330700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, IMY=55133848100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, ETS=14018169600en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10534212-

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