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Article: Global alteration of freshwaters: Influences on human and environmental well-being

TitleGlobal alteration of freshwaters: Influences on human and environmental well-being
Authors
KeywordsBiodiversity Conservation
Ecological Sustainability
Environmental Flow Allocations
Freshwater Regimes
Human Health
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer Japan. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0912-3814&site=1
Citation
Ecological Research, 2011, v. 26 n. 5, p. 865-873 How to Cite?
AbstractHuman and environmental well-being-including disease resistance or avoidance, good nutrition, and species-appropriate population dynamics-are congruent with sustained healthy conditions. Unfortunately, hydrological alterations designed to benefit human societies often have unintended-and sometimes severe-consequences for the environment and the biodiversity it supports, and hence affecting billions of people. Improving this situation necessitates new water-resource developments, better water-use efficiency, and a reduction of contamination. Overall, the influences of existing and future freshwater (FW) regimes on human and environmental well-being are varied and wide-ranging. Furthermore, the scale is daunting: >1 billion people currently live in basins likely to require river management interventions for climate change alone. Global declines in FW biodiversity, in the nutritional value, and abundance of harvestable FW and riparian products, as well as deterioration in habitat quality for many species, require solutions; as do ongoing increases in the spread of FW-related diseases and non-native species. Modifications to FWs are now manifested in population declines and non-sustainable demographics for many aquatic species, as well as in deterioration of human health. In response, scientists, policy-makers, and water users are beginning to conceptualize FWs in terms of a global water system (GWS) to better understand and manage anthropogenic impacts. This involves identifying the ecological and policy implications of changes to the GWS, establishing international programs to understand and resolve major social and environmental issues arising from those changes, and developing broad-based mitigation or restoration techniques (e.g.,environmental flow methodologies). Achieving these goals is paramount for maintaining human health as well as for the FW ecosystems upon which we depend. © 2010 The Ecological Society of Japan.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179255
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.338
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.713
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNaiman, RJen_US
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationEcological Research, 2011, v. 26 n. 5, p. 865-873en_US
dc.identifier.issn0912-3814en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179255-
dc.description.abstractHuman and environmental well-being-including disease resistance or avoidance, good nutrition, and species-appropriate population dynamics-are congruent with sustained healthy conditions. Unfortunately, hydrological alterations designed to benefit human societies often have unintended-and sometimes severe-consequences for the environment and the biodiversity it supports, and hence affecting billions of people. Improving this situation necessitates new water-resource developments, better water-use efficiency, and a reduction of contamination. Overall, the influences of existing and future freshwater (FW) regimes on human and environmental well-being are varied and wide-ranging. Furthermore, the scale is daunting: >1 billion people currently live in basins likely to require river management interventions for climate change alone. Global declines in FW biodiversity, in the nutritional value, and abundance of harvestable FW and riparian products, as well as deterioration in habitat quality for many species, require solutions; as do ongoing increases in the spread of FW-related diseases and non-native species. Modifications to FWs are now manifested in population declines and non-sustainable demographics for many aquatic species, as well as in deterioration of human health. In response, scientists, policy-makers, and water users are beginning to conceptualize FWs in terms of a global water system (GWS) to better understand and manage anthropogenic impacts. This involves identifying the ecological and policy implications of changes to the GWS, establishing international programs to understand and resolve major social and environmental issues arising from those changes, and developing broad-based mitigation or restoration techniques (e.g.,environmental flow methodologies). Achieving these goals is paramount for maintaining human health as well as for the FW ecosystems upon which we depend. © 2010 The Ecological Society of Japan.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Japan. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0912-3814&site=1en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEcological Researchen_US
dc.subjectBiodiversity Conservationen_US
dc.subjectEcological Sustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Flow Allocationsen_US
dc.subjectFreshwater Regimesen_US
dc.subjectHuman Healthen_US
dc.titleGlobal alteration of freshwaters: Influences on human and environmental well-beingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11284-010-0693-3en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052653247en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros179047-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052653247&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume26en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage865en_US
dc.identifier.epage873en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297204000002-
dc.publisher.placeJapanen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNaiman, RJ=7006543659en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike6796083-

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