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Article: Dietary plant materials reduce acrylamide formation in cookie and starch-based model systems

TitleDietary plant materials reduce acrylamide formation in cookie and starch-based model systems
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/1294
Citation
Journal Of The Science Of Food And Agriculture, 2011, v. 91 n. 13, p. 2477-2483 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Dietary plant materials have attracted much attention because of their health benefits to humans. Acrylamide is found in various heated carbohydrate-rich foods. Our previous results showed that crude aqueous extracts from diverse dietary plants and some phenolic compounds could mitigate acrylamide formation in an asparagine-glucose model system. Based on our previous study, several plant materials were selected to further investigate their inhibitory effects on acrylamide formation in cookies and starch-based model systems. RESULTS: Addition of raw powders from selected dietary plants and their crude aqueous extracts could considerably reduce acrylamide formation in both cookie and potato starch-based models. Aqueous extracts of clove at 4% caused the largest reduction (50.9%) of acrylamide in cookies, whereas addition of 2% proanthocyanidins from grape seeds gave the greatest acrylamide reduction (62.2%) in a starch-based model system. CONCLUSION: It may be feasible to use some of the tested dietary plant materials to reduce acrylamide formation in cookies and other starchy foods. © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179254
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.076
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.822
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorCai, YZen_US
dc.contributor.authorKe, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCorke, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The Science Of Food And Agriculture, 2011, v. 91 n. 13, p. 2477-2483en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-5142en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179254-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Dietary plant materials have attracted much attention because of their health benefits to humans. Acrylamide is found in various heated carbohydrate-rich foods. Our previous results showed that crude aqueous extracts from diverse dietary plants and some phenolic compounds could mitigate acrylamide formation in an asparagine-glucose model system. Based on our previous study, several plant materials were selected to further investigate their inhibitory effects on acrylamide formation in cookies and starch-based model systems. RESULTS: Addition of raw powders from selected dietary plants and their crude aqueous extracts could considerably reduce acrylamide formation in both cookie and potato starch-based models. Aqueous extracts of clove at 4% caused the largest reduction (50.9%) of acrylamide in cookies, whereas addition of 2% proanthocyanidins from grape seeds gave the greatest acrylamide reduction (62.2%) in a starch-based model system. CONCLUSION: It may be feasible to use some of the tested dietary plant materials to reduce acrylamide formation in cookies and other starchy foods. © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/1294en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Science of Food and Agricultureen_US
dc.subject.meshAcrylamide - Analysis - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshEugenia - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshFast Foods - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshFlour - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshFlowers - Chemistry - Growth & Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshFood Additives - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshFruit - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Chemicalen_US
dc.subject.meshPlant Extracts - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPlant Roots - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPlants, Edible - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshProanthocyanidins - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSolanum Tuberosum - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSpices - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshStarch - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshVitis - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshWater - Chemistryen_US
dc.titleDietary plant materials reduce acrylamide formation in cookie and starch-based model systemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCai, YZ: yzcai@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailCorke, H: harold@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCai, YZ=rp00661en_US
dc.identifier.authorityCorke, H=rp00688en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jsfa.4491en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21681761en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052634346en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052634346&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume91en_US
dc.identifier.issue13en_US
dc.identifier.spage2477en_US
dc.identifier.epage2483en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295429600028-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhu, F=35306203800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCai, YZ=8684149300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKe, J=35196133100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorke, H=7007102942en_US

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